三分赛车开奖是全国统一的吗http://www.wupxae.live/PAPERen-usThu, 04 Jul 2019 19:05:15 -0000https://assets.rbl.ms/19068909/210x.pnghttp://www.wupxae.live/PAPERChanning Tatum Files Restraining Order Against Alleged Stalkerhttp://www.wupxae.live/channing-tatum-stalker-2639085037.html

Channing Tatum has reportedly filed a restraining order against a woman who allegedly hid in his house for 10 days.

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According to documents obtained by The Blast, Tatum asked for a temporary restraining order and civil harassment order against a 36-year-old woman who purportedly hid inside his vacant home for 10 days before being arrested on June 24.

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Related | Hollyweird: How Channing Tatum Went From Stripper to Fashion Model

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Not only that, but Tatum has also reportedly asked for the protection to be extended to his two personal assistants, as well as ex Jenna Dewan and their 6-year-old daughter, Everly. Naturally, Tatum feels that his family's safety has been "threatened" by the alleged stalker, per the report.

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The publication also mentioned that the woman has previously come to his house in an attempt to contact Tatum. She also apparently claims they met a decade ago and that he invited her to stay with him.

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Photo via Getty

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Thu, 04 Jul 2019 18:07:44 +0000http://www.wupxae.live/channing-tatum-stalker-2639085037.htmlChanning tatumStalkerFamous peopleSandra Song
Rami Malek's James Bond Villain Couldn't Be a Religious Extremisthttp://www.wupxae.live/rami-malek-bond-villain-2639084391.html

Oscar winner Rami Malek said that he only took the villain role in Cary Fukunaga's forthcoming James Bond film after one important stipulation was met.

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While speaking with The Daily Mirror earlier this week, Malek — who is of Egyptian descent — revealed that he told Fukunaga that his character could not be religious extremist.

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Explaining that his Egyptian roots make up "the fabric of who I am," Malek said that, "'We cannot identify him with any act of terrorism reflecting an ideology or religion. That's not something I would entertain, so if that is why I am your choice, then you can count me out.'"

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Related | Slightly Shaken: James Bond's Legacy of Racism

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According to Malek though, Fukunaga was apparently on the same page and described his character as a "very different kind of terrorist."

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"It's another extremely clever script from the people who have figured out exactly what people want in those movies," Malek added before saying, "But I feel a substantial weight on my shoulders. I mean, Bond is something that we all grow up with."

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That said, Malek has previously spoken out about being typecast due to his background, namely within "quintessential terrorist roles."

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"I did watch actors that I knew go into auditions with one name and a year later I'd see them at auditions – Middle Eastern actors, we'd be auditioning for that quintessential terrorist role – and I'd see them sign in with different names and kept my mouth shut," Malek told the Hollywood Foreign Press Association's podcast. "I understood it, but it never spoke to me as something I needed to do."

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Photo via Getty

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Thu, 04 Jul 2019 17:23:01 +0000http://www.wupxae.live/rami-malek-bond-villain-2639084391.htmlRami malekJames bondRepresentationFilmFamous peopleSandra Song
The Woman Who Climbed the Statue of Libertyhttp://www.wupxae.live/patricia-okoumou-extreme-2639071491.html

With her daring climb up America's ultimate symbol of freedom in protest of the trump administration's family separation policy, activist Patricia Okoumou is willing to do what others won't: Put her body on the line for her beliefs.

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Last year on the Fourth of July, Patricia Okoumou climbed the Statue of Liberty.

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Okoumou, who legally immigrated to America from the Republic of Congo in 1994, scaled the iconic structure in protest of President Donald Trump's "zero tolerance" immigration policies, which had resulted in the separation and displacement of thousands of migrant children from their families at the U.S.-Mexico border.

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Originally, Okoumou and fellow members of the direct-action activist group Rise and Resist had planned to go to Ellis Island and hang a banner off the statue reading "Abolish ICE." The plan was discovered and the group was asked to leave the island by security, but Okoumou managed to sneak away undetected, and when the coast was clear, she embarked on her treacherous climb up Lady Liberty's base.

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Following a three-hour stand-off with rescue officers, during which, according to various New York City news outlets, around 4,500 Ellis Island visitors were evacuated, Okoumou came down and was promptly arrested. A press conference followed the next day, and Okoumou, released on her own recognizance, wore a T-shirt reading "white supremacy is terrorism" and indicted the Trump administration for "throwing children in cages." She attended a pre-trial court date with her lawyers a month later where she pledged to stay out of trouble, while also announcing the launch of #ReturnTheChildren, a mission to catalyze politicians and civilians alike to force the end of the government's family separation policies. It was going to be an improvisatory movement, with Okoumou deciding what types of actions or callouts she would undertake as she went along, until all of the migrant children had been reunited with their families.

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These efforts would eventually include Okoumou climbing the Eiffel Tower on two separate occasions this past Thanksgiving during a visit to Paris, despite the fact that she was still facing prison time for the Statue of Liberty climb back in the States. (She says she was inspired to climb the Eiffel Tower because it was the French who gifted America the Statue of Liberty.) She climbed several hundred feet each episode before being aggressively apprehended by French police — a physical struggle that Okoumou says led to pain she still feels in her ribs and back. On February 20 of this year, she scaled the Southwest Key detention center in Austin, Texas, which houses migrant children and claims to take efforts to reunite them with their families, including setting them up with case managers who act on their behalf.

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Following the Southwest Key incident, Okoumou was placed under house arrest ahead of her March 19 sentencing for the Lady Liberty climb. On that day, when Okoumou arrived at the Southern District courthouse in New York, she dragged her ankle bracelet with every step. Her mouth was covered in tape, which presiding Judge Gabriel Gorenstein had her remove. Following a heated defense from her lawyers, Okoumou addressed the courtroom.

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"People have fear, they have embarrassment; i have none of that."

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"This is a case against injustice," she said. "While the world watches in horror, God is taking notes...My fight will continue in the cages [if I'm put there, too]. My goal is to work to get justice for the vulnerable.

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"I am not a criminal," she concluded.

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The court sentenced Okoumou to five years' probation and 200 hours of community service.

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Growing up in the Republic of Congo, Okoumou witnessed horrors many will never encounter firsthand. The country erupted into the first of two ethnopolitical civil wars in 1993 when Okoumou was 19, during the term of its first-ever democratically elected president, Pascal Lissouba, who was eventually overthrown in 1997. When she was in college, she recalls seeing wheelbarrows carrying dead bodies during her walk to class.

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Despite all that she's seen, Okoumou says she was "not born with the fear that most people experience," adding that her fearlessness influences her views on interactions with law enforcement. "I'm not afraid of arrest or confrontation," Okoumou says.

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This same boldness can be seen in Okoumou's decision to escape the Congolese conflict and immigrate to America, a country where she had no family or connections. She came to the States in 1994 when she was 20 years old and settled in Staten Island. Over the years, she has worked in various social services jobs, including a stint at a battered women's shelter. But currently, she considers herself a full-time activist and has sustained a living through GoFundMe donations from supporters of her work.

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Related | Don't Stop Talking About 21 Savage

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When Okoumou arrived in the States, the promise of life in a free, democratic society excited her, but her eyes were quickly opened to America's own longstanding challenges, from homegrown political scandals during the Clinton administration to the country's long history with racism. She remembers first learning about the Ku Klux Klan when reading about the Civil Rights Movement. "I would think, Who are these people, and do they really exist?" she recalls.

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Later, President George W. Bush assumed office and 9/11's catastrophic events rocked the country. Okoumou saw one of the World Trade Center towers collapse. She later watched with dismay as Bush's War on Terror led to an increase of Islamophobic rhetoric and hate crimes back home, proving, once again, that racism remained a central rot of the country.

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By the time Barack Obama was running for president in 2008, Okoumou had become a naturalized citizen and very politically engaged. Inspired by Obama's campaign, she spent time canvassing and encouraging people to vote. "When [Obama] was running, I thought, God, if he wins, that's a sign that you're giving me to stay strong and believe anything is possible," she recalls.

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For the eight years Obama was president, Okoumou says she felt relief from the strains of white supremacy, a relief that evaporated during the 2016 election when Donald Trump was elected amidst rising partisanship, racism and white nationalism. It reminded her, like the civil war that divided her home country, that despite the idealistic pursuit of democracy, progress can be battered. Trump's election even led Okoumou to believe that democratic change "can be lost overnight."

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Trump particularly drew Okoumou's ire when he gave positions in his administration to Steve Bannon and Stephen Miller. The former, who served as Trump's chief strategist and senior counselor until August of 2017, has supported far-right white nationalist movements around the world, while the latter is Trump's senior policy advisor and was a chief architect of the Muslim travel ban. But, Okoumou says, it was his administration's family separation policy that "was the straw that broke the camel's back."

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"I'm not afraid of arrest or confrontation."

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Ever since then-Attorney General Jeff Sessions promised increased enforcement of the Trump administration's "zero tolerance" policy back in May of 2018, an estimated 2,737 children have been separated from their parents, according to a federal report released this past January. But there are many discrepancies with this figure and, according to this same report, many thousands more children may have been separated from their families as early as 2017 before any tracking system began, further underscoring the chaos, disorganization and mismanagement surrounding the policy. And, although Trump signed an executive order to end family separations last June, long-lasting ramifications like a lifetime of "toxic stress" due to young children held interminably by ICE officials, women having miscarriages caused by stress and inadequate medical care, abuse in the detention centers and illness will outlast this policy. And, as of this February, eight months after the policy was supposed to have ended, administration reports said 245 children were still apart from their families in custody.

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In the midst of all this, Okoumou decided the way to make the biggest statement about the colliding issues of anti-immigration policy, family separation, xenophobia and racism was to involve America's ultimate symbol of freedom.

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Okoumou says she spent the morning before heading to Ellis Island with Rise and Resist like she does most mornings: in solitude and prayer. She doesn't listen to music or own a TV. She doesn't have a family. She lives alone on Staten Island, but is not lonely. She's an avid runner.

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Okoumou did not know that she was going to climb the Statue of Liberty until she arrived there with her group. She'd never been to Ellis Island before and was in awe of the structure's majestic size.

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She says she had a conversation with God that morning. "It was like, Tell me again? You want me to do what?" she says. "People have fear, they have embarrassment; there are a number of things that would prevent someone from doing something that would get a lot of attention. I have none of that."

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Related | Tierra Whack: Wow, Her Mind

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So as her cohorts were being escorted away from the statue's railing, where they attempted to hang their "Abolish ICE" banner, Okoumou scanned the premises, hid from the view of officers circling the base and an overhead NYPD helicopter, and made her move. The climb from the ground to the pedestal the statue sits atop is 154 feet. There were no footholds or grips Okoumou could use to pull herself to the top, and she wasn't wearing a harness or any other support gear. Scaling the pedestal, according to Okoumou, involved hanging on for dear life with the tips of her fingers and toes and using her body weight to pull herself farther up. She took deep breaths before certain pulls. She can't say how long it took because time stood still.

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Once she was finally positioned on the statue's base, having completed her pact with God, she took a nap.

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Click Here to Order Zendaya's Extreme Issue

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Photography: James Emmerman

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Thu, 04 Jul 2019 12:22:14 +0000http://www.wupxae.live/patricia-okoumou-extreme-2639071491.htmlPatricia okoumouPoliticsStatue of libertyStory Michael Love Michael / Photography James Emmerman
Kim Kardashian Wins $2.7 Million in Copycat Dress Lawsuithttp://www.wupxae.live/kim-kardashian-missguided-lawsuit-2639077500.html

Kim Kardashian has been awarded $2.5 million in damages — plus $60,000 in lawyer fees — from fast-fashion brand, Missguided USA.

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TMZ reports that Kardashian won her suit against Misguided for "using her name and likeness" without permission in order to sell knockoffs of a Yeezy dress she wore — though the win was the result of Missguided failing to respond to the suit. As a result, Kardashian was given $2.5 million by default, though she originally sought $10 million in damages.

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Related | Kim Kardashian Retweets Photo of Her Juicy Couture Tracksuit

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According to the publication, the court ruled in favor of Kardashian seeing as how the Missguided website features "entire pages dedicated to selling and knocking off dresses inspired by Kim," though the actual problem is their usage of her photos to make it seem like she endorses the brand.

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Kardashian originally filed the suit in February after Missguided debuted a copy of a Yeezy dress she was being fitting in. In the post, Kardashian wrote, "fast fashion brands, can you please wait until I wear this in real life before you knock it off?" — an inquiry that Missguided responded to by writing, "The devil works hard but Missguided works harder @kimkardashian you've only got a few days before this drops online."

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According to the publication, Missguided is now permanently barred from using Kardashian's trademarks — including her likeness — to market merchandise.

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Photo via Getty

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Thu, 04 Jul 2019 02:45:00 +0000http://www.wupxae.live/kim-kardashian-missguided-lawsuit-2639077500.htmlKim kardashianMissguidedLawsuitsFamous peopleFashionSandra Song
Cardi B Asks Fans For 2020 Presidential Candidate Questionshttp://www.wupxae.live/cardi-b-2020-questions-2639077423.html

Cardi B — noted Trump critic — is currently asking her fans to submit questions for Democratic politicians in the running for the 2020 presidential nomination.

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In the run-up to the next Democratic candidate debate later this month, Cardi implored her followers to share their questions for them in her Instagram comments — and even hinted at the possibility of some getting answered.

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Related | Stephen Colbert Petitions For Cardi B to Give State of Union Rebuttal

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"THIS MIGHT BE YOUR CHANCE TO GET YOUR QUESTION ANSWERED!!" she wrote. "I would like to ask my favorite democratic candidate about police brutality.What would you like to ask ? what change would you like to see in your community and in the USA?"

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Watch her video message, below, and submit your questions via her Instagram.

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Photo via Getty

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Thu, 04 Jul 2019 00:24:51 +0000http://www.wupxae.live/cardi-b-2020-questions-2639077423.htmlCardi b2020Presidential electionDemocratsPete buttigiegKamala harrisElizabeth warrenTrumpFamous peoplePoliticsSandra Song
Jake Paul's Team 10 Launches Internal Investigation Into Transphobia Allegationshttp://www.wupxae.live/team-10-transphobia-investigation-2639077014.html

Jake Paul's Team 10 collective is launching an "internal investigation" into YouTuber Lilah Gibney's allegations of transphobia.

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Earlier this week, Gibney posted a video with her friend, Kendall Raindrop, claiming that they were ousted from a house party at the YouTuber incubator in Calabasas for not being "real girls."

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Related | How the Trans Community Is Making Its Voice Heard on YouTube

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According to the vlog, Gibney and Raindrop were told by Team 10 editor Blaine O'Roark that they had to leave the mansion, because he "thought you guys were going to come with real girls." Not only that, but the duo posted video evidence of O'Roark saying he's "not being transphobic" when questioned about his use of the term "real girls."

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Now, Team 10 has responded by saying they are taking the allegations "seriously" and are looking into the issue to "determine exactly what unfolded, and the full context."

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"Jake Paul and Team 10 have continuously embraced the LGBTQ community with open arms and a commitment to use the brands [sic] substantial social media platforms to raise awareness and support for everyone within the LGBTQ community and beyond," they wrote in a statement. "There is simply no room whatsoever for ignorance on matters of sexuality and gender identity, which is why we take the matter at hand very seriously."

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That said, Gibney wasn't impressed with the statement. In a follow-up tweet, she wrote, "wait what is there to investigate??? video proof usually is enough babe!"

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"i wasn't welcomed with 'open arms' but told you LEAVE," she continued. "so grossed out & hurt that transphobia is being normalized & not talked about like its a real thing that transgender people deal with DAILY. period."

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Gibney also previously told The Daily Dot that she was threatened with legal action by a Team 10 manager who asked her to remove the video. See what Gibney has to say in full, below.


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Photo via Getty

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Thu, 04 Jul 2019 00:12:31 +0000http://www.wupxae.live/team-10-transphobia-investigation-2639077014.htmlJake paulLilah gibneyTransphobiaTeam 10Blaine o'roarkFamous peopleInternet cultureLgbtqSandra Song
Mindy Kaling on Motherhood, Politics and Joy Shavehttp://www.wupxae.live/mindy-kaling-joy-shave-2638994028.html

Mindy Kaling has consistently been on the front lines of a witty and empowering brand of comedy, carving her own niche in an otherwise male-dominated industry. With her charismatic performances on The Office, Late Night, and her own production, The Mindy Project, the actress is often pegged alongside the likes of comedy giants such as Amy Poehler and Maya Rudolph.

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Now with a brand new partnership with independent razor brand, joy shave, Kaling is pushing for her fans to find the same sense of empowerment and joy in their shaving routines.

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The new entrant in the shaving market identifies itself as an outlier in an otherwise saturated realm of pink handles and smooth razors. Joy isn't selling big and false claims; instead it relies on simpler and attainable goals: to save your time, and make it easy, fun, and relaxing.

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"We understand that shaving is not the most exciting part of your day and shaving can get a bit complicated and a little overwhelming," said Sarah Chow, head of Joy Shave."With Joy, we're going to bring it all back to the essentials, so you can shave, rinse, and get back to doing all the other things you want to do."


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The razor comes in two "universally appealing" pink and teal non-slip grip handles along with five blades. There's also a shave gel and a mousse that come scented with summer lily and cucumber aloe to enhance the feeling of relaxation. "Joy does what it promises, and it doesn't make grandiose promises it can't keep," says Joy Co-Founder and Head of Communications MyAnh Nghiem. "So, we promise to give you a great shave and try to make some witty jokes along the way."

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Even though Joy Shave's ethos lies in empowerment, Kaling has rarely been involved in beauty brand endorsements, so this partnership comes as a bit of a surprise.

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"I have made a career off creating my own opportunities," Kaling says."The films and TV work I've done, you would know that I've not based my career on my looks or being considered traditionally beautiful. So for me, business is not the normal way that usually works in Hollywood. I'm attracted to companies and brands who like that about me. I also just find that I don't know any other way so it's easy for me to stick to that."

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Unlike most influencers and celebrities who either push their own personal labels or endorse fairly big names, Kaling has only decided to lend her name to brands she finds a personal connection with — a principle she has stuck to throughout all of her wide range of creative work.

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Below, the actress, writer and producer tells PAPER about her new partnership with joy, why she won't get too political in her work, and the challenges of single motherhood.

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What prompted you to do this collaboration?

I get approached by a lot of different companies to partner with them because I love my Instagram so much and I really take the people I follow seriously along with what they are actually selling, or making. I care about if it seems really authentic to them and if it is a quality product. I do the same for myself, so I have to see the actual product to trust it. With Joy razors, I tried them on and I just completely fell in love with the product. It's so simple. The razors are so pretty, the packaging is the best. And I usually use a men's razor. I used to not care that about how a razor looked really, but I put so much care into my other beauty products. I'm happy because these are just as aesthetically pretty, well made and as good as the stuff I am putting on my face. So, I'm really excited about it.

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Empowerment has been a major theme across your work and also this collaboration with Joy. Why has this been such a consistent part of your platform?

The films and TV work I've done, you would know that I've not based my career on my looks or being considered traditionally beautiful. So for me, business is not the normal way that usually works in Hollywood. I'm attracted to companies and brands who like that about me. I also just find that I don't know any other way, so it's easy for me to stick to that.

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Even though Late Night and The Mindy Project were primarily comedies, they touch on a lot of topical, political themes. At the same time, there are horrible things happening in terms of women's rights or the president being accused of rape. How do you stay inspired to make work that is positive, but still challenges the status quo?

I found that no matter what your political beliefs are, nobody wants to go see a movie or TV show to be lectured, where someone's political statements seem like they're being pushed down your throat. When I work, I want to create something that is really authentic and that is true in my experience or true to the experience of the character that I am working with; and often that can be political. Because I am an Indian woman over the age of 35 who is not traditionally beautiful, the work that I do is sometimes inherently political. So, for me, I want to entertain. I want people to relate to characters, but I don't work with an activist hat on. I don't create things from that position because I don't think it is very productive for me to get people to try to change their minds. I also am a comedian.

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Cancel culture is huge right now. Do you feel some sort of added pressure to highlight certain things or just make your work more political?

I'm reading more into cancel culture, but I don't let my fears of social media backlash dictate the way I create art.

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You are a new mom, do you feel like there are parts of the experience nobody talks about or was a big surprise to you?

There are the challenges of motherhood and there are the challenges of single motherhood. So, I am doing both of the things. They are so intricately linked to each other. To me, I'm raising my daughter by myself and I had an incredible experience. I wouldn't exchange any of it, but it's a ton of work. And, I have privileges that certain single mothers who work do not in this country, but I still take a lot of the same strains, wishing I could be in two places at once. I find that very challenging — to be the breadwinner of the house and to be a presence for [my daughter]. I'm just figuring it out, to be honest. That's what my life has been like for the past year and a half since she has been born.

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How are you balancing your work with all of it?

Three months after she was born, I shot the movie Late Night in New York and took her with me to shoot that, and I shot Four Weddings and Funeral while she was a little baby. She moved to London with me so I could shoot that there. Work just continued and I just decided that she's portable.

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She'd gone along with us and doesn't protest. This is my life now. We go everywhere as a unit together. To that said to answer your question, I do think that ..."Do I wish there were more day?" Yes. "Do I wish the weekends were three days?" Of course. Everyone thinks that if you have kids or don't have kids. For me, especially it would be great to have more time with her.

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Are you working on something currently?

I'm writing a movie right now for Priyanka Chopra and me to star in. That would take place in India, and it's a comedy. I also have some essays in the works for Amazon.

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Photos courtesy of joy shave

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Wed, 03 Jul 2019 22:49:07 +0000http://www.wupxae.live/mindy-kaling-joy-shave-2638994028.htmlMindy kailingJoy shaveLate nightThe mindy projectJoy razorShave gelBeautyJeena Sharma
Zendaya Is the Face of Lanc?me Id?lehttp://www.wupxae.live/zendaya-lancome-idole-campaign-2639073109.html

Lanc?me has been having a major moment ever since bringing on Zendaya as its official brand ambassador back in February. Now the luxury brand has signed the actress on as the face of their new "feminine" fragrance, Id?le.

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Related | Seeing Red: Zendaya to the Extreme

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The creators behind the unique formulation are three dynamic perfumer women: Shyamala Maisondieu, Adriana Medina, and Nadège Le Garlanteze.

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?Featuring a blend of sustainably sourced Isparta rose petal essence from Turkey, Centifolia rose, bergamot, accords of pear, and India jasmine grandiflorum, the smell has been described as "musky chypre floral."


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"I guess you could say I'm growing up, and I feel like I'm coming into my adulthood," Zendaya told WWD.

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In talking about the collaboration, the young actress also described what beauty means to her. "I always say there really is no definition of beauty. We should always create our own definitions for what that means to us," she said. "I think that's the coolest part about the word, and I feel similarly to the word 'style,' you know? Where, really, it's more so however you define it. Whatever you want to create and believe it is for you."

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Related | Hunter Schafer: Leading the Charge for Femme Representation

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The actress, who currently stars as the lead protagonist in HBO's teen drama Euphoria, will also appear in promotions for Lanc?me's makeup and skincare in the coming months.

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Lanc?me Id?le launches August 22 and will be available for purchase worldwide at Lanc?me and select retailers.

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Photo via Getty

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Wed, 03 Jul 2019 21:24:10 +0000http://www.wupxae.live/zendaya-lancome-idole-campaign-2639073109.htmlZendayaLanc?me id?leFragranceBeautyCollaborationWwdEuphoriaJeena Sharma
Jaclyn Hill Has Deleted All of Her Social Mediahttp://www.wupxae.live/jaclyn-hill-social-media-2639074928.html

Once again, Jaclyn Hill is back in the news but this time for less incendiary reasons. After receiving backlash following her newly launched lipsticks that customers said were "moldy and hairy," the beauty blogger has reportedly gone off social media, completely deleting all her accounts.

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While her personal Instagram and Twitter accounts have disappeared, the Instagram page for her novice beauty line, Jaclyn Cosmetics remains active.

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While neither Hill nor the brand have issued have issued an official statement explaining the absence, fans have speculated it's most likely to restore her well-being and take care of her mental health. There are some, however, that are seemingly less supportive and more suspicious of the influencer's motivations, claiming that it's a convenient way to escape the numerous messages being sent to her demanding refunds for the damaged lipsticks.

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Although initially Hill defended her damaged products, blaming shipping and manufacturing for the issue, shortly after the criticism intensified, she promised to refund all customers, including those that did not receive the bad batch of products.

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"I'm going to be issuing a full refund, including shipping and tax, to every single customer from Jaclyn Cosmetics," she said on her now defunct Instagram account. "I don't care about the loss of this money. You know how embarrassing this is for me. I will do everything in my power to make this right moving forward and learn from this lesson God has given me."

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While it's uncertain when Hill might reactivate her social media pages, her mother, Robin Sumrall, shared a note on Instagram, which now seems to have been removed. Addressing her daughter's absence, she said that Hill purely "needed time" and support from her fans. "As her Mom it has been heartbreaking in so many ways," she says in the beginning of the note.

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"It was difficult and so very disappointing enough that some of her lipsticks had issues but the onslaught of hate, lies and even betrayal has by far been the worse part. It has been shocking. No one deserves to be beaten when they are already sad and down. But this post is not intended to focus on the negative but rather the positivity that has come out of this. From the bottom of my heart I want to thank those of you who are true and loyal followers and friends of Jaclyn! I've always said that she has the very best followers of all!"

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Photo via Getty

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Wed, 03 Jul 2019 21:16:40 +0000http://www.wupxae.live/jaclyn-hill-social-media-2639074928.htmlJaclyn hillBeautyInstagramTwitterInfluencerBloggerRobin sumrallJeena Sharma
Disney Casts Halle Bailey as Ariel For 'Little Mermaid'http://www.wupxae.live/halle-bailey-ariel-2639075238.html

Watch out world, she's grown now — Halle Bailey from the musical super duo, Chloe x Halle, is about to make her big screen debut in Disney's long-awaited The Little Mermaid remake as the one and only Ariel.

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We can't think of a better person to play the sea-dwelling beauty, either, since Bailey's got it all. While she's only periodically flexed her acting chops, her voice is beyond fitting for the role. Just imagining her belting out "Part of Your World" in the silky-smooth tone she invokes on The Kids Are Alright, Chloe x Halle's 2018 project, is enough to give us chills.


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The live-action remake has already cast rapper Awkwafina and actor Jacob Tremblay from The Room to play pivotal roles in the film. Awkwafina will play the role of Scuttle, while Tremblay will take on the role of Flounder, Ariel's sidekick. The announcement of Bailey's involvement in the film comes fresh off the other announcements, with an impending Ursula announcement hoped for by fans.

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Related | There's Something Special About Chloe x Halle

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Many fans are campaigning for a drag queen to portray the sea witch, since legend has it that Divine inspired the original drawing of the villain. RuPaul's Drag Race winner, Bob The Drag Queen, has called specifically for comedy legend Jackie Beat to take on the role, with many other drag queens agreeing, including Drag Race favorite, Eureka O'Hara.


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Despite pleas from fans, Variety reports that Melissa McCarthy is ultimately in talks to play the eel-surrounded Disney super villain. There's still hope, though, considering that original reports and speculation had Zendaya playing the lead, Ariel. Anything can happen in the wonderful world of Disney, so who knows when we'll find out more official info on the cast of the new film. One thing's for sure, though, and that's that Disney made the right decision casting Bailey as the underseas, trinket-obsessed princess for the ages.

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Photo via BFA

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Wed, 03 Jul 2019 21:05:02 +0000http://www.wupxae.live/halle-bailey-ariel-2639075238.htmlHalle baileyThe little mermaidArielBrendan Wetmore
Porter Robinson Invites Us Into His Worldhttp://www.wupxae.live/second-sky-festival-porter-robinson-2638920428.html

"I want to be surrounded when I'm on stage by acts that I really love and respect," North Carolina-born electronic producer Porter Robinson, explains to me in his trailer. We're backstage at his new festival, Second Sky, created to provide music lovers a new space to catch a specially curated, yet diverse group of acts that fit into the electronic mold. "You don't get to choose who you are associated with now, especially with how much of your associations have become algorithm driven." His frustration is understandable, as a quick perusal of Spotify's recommended artists will turn up what essentially amounts to a "best of" list for popular EDM acts such as Dillon Francis, Nero, and Knife Party, which at one point may have accurately represented his dubstep-influenced electro beginnings but now feels horribly out of touch with the more melodic indie-electronica direction he's taken his work since.

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Out of this sonic dissonance, Second Sky was born. A new festival personally curated by Robinson, it features a lineup that exclusively consists of his favorite artists all performing on one stage. Put on with the help of the logistical minds behind Coachella, Goldenvoice, the boutique festival took over the Oakland shoreline for a sold out weekend that promised an immersive experience inspired by the rich visual world Robinson had crafted behind his music.

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Related | Arcosanti FORM Is More Than Just a Beautiful Place to Party

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As we chat the night before the festival opens its doors, it's clear that Robinson has a lot on his mind. He's headlined plenty of festivals before, but this will be the first time he's putting one on. On top of all of the new practical things he needs to now worry about, like food, security and production, he also has to figure out how to convince his fans who may have discovered him through more mainstream EDM channels to be open to smaller acts outside of that genre. "I want to see artists who I love, succeed. I want them to have a platform," Robinson emphasizes.

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"Anamanaguchi are an example of an act that if I had to create my own related artists on Spotify, I would put them right at the top," Robinson says. "I wanted to take back a bit of control in that sense too and help out artists who I think are most deserving."

Related | Meesh Wants To Be 'More Than Friends'

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Robinson is candid about his struggles with his perfectionism, "I think especially after my album, Worlds, I took a step back. I wanted to be, in a certain way, inaccessible to folks because I'm was so concerned with control that I didn't really want to make myself that available." He goes on to talk about retreating from social media and feeling like he wasn't delivering on what his fans wanted from him, saying, "I think I eventually came to find that approach really debilitating."

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Things began to change in 2017. Robinson debuted a new project, Virtual Self, that tapped into a more rave-inspired sound folding in elements of speedcore, happy hardcore, garage, and any other genre one might find on a vintage DDR soundtrack. It was an artistic indulgence that paid off; Robinson was rewarded with his first-ever Grammy nomination for the song "Ghost Voices" off the EP and fans were happy to just see him back in action. Like Worlds, Virtual Self was a project heavily grounded in aesthetics with fully fleshed out characters and Matrix-like visuals, providing a rich alternate reality for the music to inhabit. Second Sky was no exception. In fact, it was the perfect chance for Robinson to bring Worlds to life.

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"We've always had this [idea] kicking around in the back of our minds, of creating Porterland," he says of the festival. "There are so many different characters in my music videos and in my show visuals. I always thought it'd be cool to create a physical space that paid homage to some of those things." The moment you entered the festival grounds, attendees were treated to an immersive canopy of hanging purple and white flowers being spit out in front of giant cloud-covered letters spelling out "Second Sky" underneath the San Francisco skyline.

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Elsewhere festival-goers were invited to write a postcard to themselves from the festival that could either be delivered immediately after the festival ended or a year later. It was a small touch that you might've missed it you weren't brave enough to make it past the massive merch lines, but was there nonetheless. The day actually started out with a 30-minute set from Robinson as Virtual Self, a choice intentionally made to ensure more people made it out early and would then stick around to watch the bands they might not have been already familiar with.

Related | Perfume Is the Global Future of J-Pop

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The star of first day was easily Japanese synth-pop darling, Wednesday Campanella. Perhaps the least known act on the lineup, there was something immediately captivating about the group's charismatic frontwoman KOM_I. Falling in and out of a giant silk curtain suspended behind her, the moment that made everyone's jaw drop and fish out their phones from their pockets was when KOM_I descended into the audience with a giant inflated silk ball in tow before letting the wind carry it away over Oakland. Everyone watched on in awe as KOM_I then climbed atop a ladder in the middle of the audience to deliver her closing number, as festival organizers ran around panicked about the runaway ball.

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"I don't want to sound egotistical but G Jones is very open about the fact that his live shows are directly inspired by Worlds and the live shows that I've put together," Robinson says. "I think that American electronic music gets such a hard rep sometimes — sometimes rightly. But part of the legacy of electronic music is really aesthetically controlled, tightly put together, beautiful live shows, like what G Jones has done. If I have some part in that, that makes me feel really proud."

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It was not uncommon to run into the other performers on the lineup catching another act's set. Sarah Bonito of Kero Kero Bonito popped out for a quick cameo in Anamanguchi's "Miku," Nina Las Vegas could be seen popping into Cashmere Cat's trailer backstage, and practically everyone with an artist wristband piled into the sound booth to watch Robinson close out each night. (Many of the band's parents even made it out for the fest.) Throughout the weekend, you could often find members of the Robinson family stationed outside of the booth for the Robinson Malawi Fund, a charity founded by Porter after his brother, Mark's, battle with Burkitt lymphoma. (By the end of the weekend they had raised $77,000 which Porter and Goldenvoice then matched to bring the total up to a staggering $154,000.) The crowd was an even mix of EDM bros and people that looked like they just walked out of an anime convention. I remember at one point looking to my left to see a person performing light-up glove tricks and then looking to my right to find a game of Magic: The Gathering being played at my feet.

Related | Kero Kero Bonito Dream in Grunge on 'Make Believe'

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The second day of the festival was clearly leading to the big reveal of who the "Special Guest" was. When the time came you could feel the anticipation build as the festival mascot, Potaro, a blue winged ball-like creature based off of the Worlds album art, waddled on stage only to reveal that it was none other than Skrillex inside. The sound that erupted from the crowd was positively seismic.

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As the weekend draws to a close there hangs a palpable magic in the air. Madeon joined Robinson on stage to sing one last time their collaborative single, "Shelter," but it almost doesn't even matter if the mic is on, since the crowd already is singing along to every word. The feeling that something much bigger has been at work the whole weekend finally reaches a tipping point. As all of the artists gathered backstage for an impromptu after party, each taking turns on the decks to play songs they might otherwise not get the chance to play out, there was an air of giddy euphoria.

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As everyone went their separate ways at the end of the night, hungover and exhausted from two days baking under the Bay Area sun, I remembered what Robinson ultimately said about what he wanted to accomplish with Second Sky. "If you have the ability to make something good and it's meaningful to you and it helps other people then that's worthwhile. I'm just trying to do that to the greatest extent that I can."

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Photography by Jasmine Safaeian

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Wed, 03 Jul 2019 20:39:51 +0000http://www.wupxae.live/second-sky-festival-porter-robinson-2638920428.htmlSecond skyOaklandFestivalFestival cultureWorldsElectronicMusicDanceEdmNina las vegasVirtual selfMadeonCashmere catG jonesKero kero bonitoWednesday campanellaChrome sparksSkrillexAnamanaguchiPorter robinsonMatt Moen
DMing with Rare DMhttp://www.wupxae.live/rare-dm-vanta-black-2639072721.html

This spring, New York synth-pop artist Rare DM (born: Erin Hoagg) released her debut album, Vanta Black. The LP is a cohesive exercise — or exorcise, if purging yourself of demons is your cup of tea — in ridding herself of dark inner truths by daring to lay it all bare. As pop music has done with impeccable precision through the ages, Hoagg explores who she is within and without relationships.

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She does this through a range of analog and vintage synths, and shimmering melodies vaguely recalling early Kate Bush and Eurythmics — all elements work to create a foreboding aura. But Hoagg updates her self-produced retro electronic sound in often surprising ways, and the devil's in the details: In "Softboy," she interpolates TLC's classic Y2K hit "No Scrubs" for a stream of consciousness poem about wanting a man with a backbone. "I don't want no scrub, but I don't want a softboy," which can be interpreted numerous ways.

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For the haunted video, directed by Jake Moore and Oliver Rivard, Hoagg hunts down the softboy who ghosts her to find closure, literally. The theme of love without resolution is a theme throughout Vanta Black, which Hoagg describes as an album made during her darkest hour. The song "Caracal," which channels elements of underground witch house, finds Hoagg attempting to give herself the closure she seeks. "I'll see you around," she sighs into the ether.

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These communication breakdowns are often exacerbated by modern technology. Who doesn't have or hasn't had a semi-toxic relationship to social media? PAPER slid into Hoagg's DMs to connect, and it turns out she's just as candid online as she is in her music.


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@michaelxomichael: So I described this album to myself as "a black cloud that never quite lifts," like a spooky dream. This to me is a good thing. I'm curious about how you approached setting the mood for the record.

@rare_dm_: I like that! Well, first off, I am always attracted to darker and more dissonant sounds, and I use analog gear that often has a lot of quirks, sometimes dusty sounding synths. So that definitely adds to the darker sound. As far as how I write my melodies and the content of the songs, it is a moody record because all of the songs come from really dark times for me. Some of them are fully stream of consciousness lyrics I never changed. "Softboy" was one take, so was "Best," for example. I was wildly miserable haha.

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Omg I get that. On "Softboy" you said you didn't want a scrub but you also didn't want a softboy, which was interesting. I was like, well, what does Erin want?

Unconditional love for eternity with someone I love back lolllll. All of the songs on the album are honest and written from real experiences though. I like writing from imagined realities and characters, but this album didn't end up with much of that. Besides the fact that "Jade" was a lot of what I was imagining someone was doing without me haha.

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Yes, you're really specific actually for an album that lives in the shadows. Like on "Spell Cast," you sing about being real and not someone's projected idea of you within a relationship.

And their projected idea of other people from the past!! Getting compared to someone that a partner was with before you is not a good place to be. They broke up for a reason yet they haunt your s/o.

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No, that's so frustrating. It's like being seen more as a mirage or a hologram than the real u. So with you being miserable during writing these songs, it seems like you really trusted yourself to open up about those experiences. You're not holding back.

It's a cathartic experience and venting within your own songwriting can better make you understand a situation and what you need to do better, and move forward. My heart is on my sleeve, always, and especially within my songwriting.

Me too! I'm a cancer and can't help but feel everything. What are you?

I'm a Leo.

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I'm on the cusp!

I can tell! Happy almost birthday. Softboy is a cancer, he was very guarded. "Spell Cast," "Best," and "Jade" are also about him lol.

Wait, what are the signs of the other songs? Or even like five of your faves.

Omg fun!! OK, "Darkeyes" was another, different Cancer. And "Night Watch" and "Think Quiet," that's 4/20 birthday, so a Pisces? "Almost a Year," I'll have to try and figure that out.

I love "Wholehearted," [especially the lyric] "I gotta find a new way to dance.

Aw thank you!! So much longing in that song. I was so in love, in a way that's one of the only hopeful songs on there lol. Hopeful in a very sad way. OK! Capricorn for the "Almost a Year" guy. I figured it out, there was a birthday invite on a Facebook message lol. So funny.

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Are you still online friends with your exes?

The ex that "Night Watch" and "Caracal" are about (he was a heroin addict) didn't ever have any social media. The "Dark Eyes" and "Almost a Year" people, yes, still online friends, neither ended up being relationships. Not even full hook ups tbh. The "Softboy" guy, we were until recently. We broke up and then we got back together and were amazing for a year and a half (he went to my family reunion with me in Michigan for a week and met like 40 people), and then he got a temp job in Amsterdam and then broke my heart again. Now we are not talking. This is after Vanta Black. During the second time we were together, he would go to my shows and be embarrassed during certain songs haha.

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Some of this is still fresh for you but I guess that's because life goes on... but sometimes even when you need a break from a person or situation, something else happens. Like pop-ups online, but in real life.

Yessss!! That's exactly what "Softboy" is about actually. Not being able to avoid the person you are sad about/trying to get over because you "run into" them online.

I love the mix of dark wave vintage synths and relationships with and without technology.

Thank you!!! The synth of "Wholeheart" (human sounding pad synth) and "Night Watch" (the vibraphone sounding synth) is a Casio CZ 5000 I found on the street in Soho. That was my first real synth in NYC.

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Amazing. I have a couple more q's... Does sorcery play a role in your work?

Interesting question!!!! I love fantasy books and magic. I am very influenced by books like His Dark Materials and the Abhorsen series. I can't say that I am "casting spells" with my songs necessarily but maybe I am. So I would say... maybe... I do use music to escape reality, and I really love books with alternate realities and different worlds.

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What does Vanta Black mean to you?

It is my darkest hour, I haven't experienced that kind of heartbreak before. I can thank Anish Kapoor for the title. It was also a very magical accidental cover that made everything make sense. The one [photographer] Lissy [Elle Laricchia] took, it was just such a mood. It all came together then. She's my oldest friend in NYC and I met her looking for an apartment in 2013. We never ended up living together, but have both stayed at each other's places when between apartments. She's one of my best and closest friends and has done all of my album art.

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What helps you stay light?

Creating things, whether music or visual art, biking, swimming, dancing, talks with friends. Treating myself well by finding time to let myself find calm. Tea with a face mask and candles. Eating lots of fruit and vegetables. Listening to music and seeing art. I came to NYC for fashion design school at FIT originally, and then dropped out after my associate's degree to pursue music. My first instruments since I was 11 are fashion and percussion, so both are very important to me. Thought I should tell you that, too.



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For more on Rare DM, follow her @rare_dm and visit here. Catch Rare DM live at one of her upcoming shows, below.

7/11: Austin, TX — Cheer Up Charlies, for Nite School with IAYD, Mutant, Blank Hellscape
7/18: New York City — Alphaville with Sur Back, Den-mate
7/29: New York City — Baby's All Right with Pixel Grip, Limbo

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Photography/Art Direction: Lissy Elle Laricchia
Hair: Sean Bennett
Styling: Erin Hoagg
Headpiece: SKNDLSS


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Wed, 03 Jul 2019 20:34:56 +0000http://www.wupxae.live/rare-dm-vanta-black-2639072721.htmlVanta blackMusicNew musicRare dmMichael Love Michael
Hayley Kiyoko Rides for Pridehttp://www.wupxae.live/hayley-kiyoko-w-hotels-pride-2639063349.html

Now that all the confetti has settled and the glitter has washed off from this year's Pride, it feels like the perfect time to take stock of where we're at and where we need to go next. Following a year that saw the release of her highly anticipated debut album, Expectations, Hayley Kiyoko is understandably feeling pretty good about herself. Dubbed by the artist as "20gayteen," last year not only saw Kiyoko collaborating with the likes of Kehlani and dueting with Taylor Swift, who would later invite her to be in the music video for "You Need To Calm Down," but also had her walking away with a VMA for Best New Artist.

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It's the morning of World Pride and Kiyoko is now gearing up for a personal first. As a Pride Ambassador for W Hotels, the pop star is set to ride atop the company's float in the New York Pride parade as millions gather along 5th avenue to celebrate the 50th anniversary of Stonewall. If she's nervous, she surely doesn't show it as she warmly greets guests gathered for a photo op the morning before the parade. Even a four-hour delay in the parade start isn't enough to phase Kiyoko; as soon as we embark on the planned route, she's hopping on and off the float to take pictures with eager fans pressed up against the barricades.

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Related | Hayley Kiyoko Knows What She Needs

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Often referred to as the "Lesbian Jesus" by her fans, the gravity of the moment doesn't appear to be lost on Kiyoko. She admits she wasn't always the out and proud queer woman she is today, but it's clear that she understands her place now as a role model for those still coming to terms with their sexuality.

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PAPER sat down with Kiyoko to talk about Pride, what the music industry needs to do for queer voices, finding LGBTQ+ spaces while traveling, and what lies on the horizon for the singer.

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Last year was 20gayteen. What has 2019 been like?

It's been great. I've been working on my new music and getting ready for this next chapter, which has been super fun. Today's just really cool. I've been reflecting on everything. I've never felt the energy that is New York City during Pride. The energy here is so inclusive, positive, and hopeful. I was getting emotional yesterday walking around. I feel really lucky to be here.

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What's been a highlight for you in the past year?

Things like this have definitely been a highlight. Having the opportunity to be surrounded by people that love you and support you, and it's hard because some people don't get the opportunity to be surrounded by that. They see it on social media and they're like, "Aw man, I wish I could be there." So I feel very grateful that I get to experience it and get to be there first hand, and hopefully share that with others, and eventually they'll get to experience that as well.

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Personally, how have you seen Pride change?

My first Pride was in Vancouver; my friend dragged me there and I had my head down the whole time because I didn't want anyone to know I was gay and that I was there. I thought that if I was proud of who I was then people would judge me. Now I'm going to be waving in a parade — proud to be who I am and celebrating that. It's been a long journey, but it's been very exciting. It's very empowering to be a part. Every Pride, having it annually and pushing yourself a little bit further every year to love yourself more is amazing.

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How have you seen the music industry change towards its attitudes of queer women?

I feel the music industry has become more progressive in the past two years. More artists are open with who they are, and proud of who they are. It's definitely been a major difference. Even when I began the music journey, I had no idea I was going to be so outspoken with my sexuality. Now that's a part of who I am and empowering others to be themselves.

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What is your hope for the future when it comes to the music industry?

I hope that everyone can listen to everyone. I think right now it's still like, "Oh, you're a gay artist... only your community listens to you." I feel like hopefully, we'll be cross-pollinating as far as listening to different types of music whether you're in the community or not.

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What would you like to see more of?

What I'd love to see more of is all these brands potentially supporting Pride to actually be an advocate and to actually donate their bajillions of dollars to charities that are doing real change. If you're showcasing a flag or you're selling a flag, you should be actively doing something in the community. That's probably something that I'd like to see more because I think we're still very on the surface level.

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What does "gaycation" mean to you?

I don't know, being surrounded by gay people? Honestly, I feel like I'm on gaycation right now. I went out to dinner with my best friends last night and they're not gay, but they're extreme allies. To me, that's a gaycation; being able to be myself and knowing that the people I'm with love me for who I am.

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You obviously travel a ton as an artist. When you're going to a new place, do you try and scope out where the LGBTQ scene is? What makes you comfortable in the new locale?

Normally, the scene comes to me when I travel, so I don't really have to seek it out too much. But it is really interesting to travel and see that there's people like me everywhere. You kind of forget and then you're in Switzerland or Iceland and they're like, "We love you. This is our group and we all hang out, and this is where we go." It's just really cool to see that there are safer places for people to gather.

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What can we expect to see from you in the future?

I have new music on the way. I just got back from Joshua Tree and was writing a bunch of stuff in the desert. This year is going to be a lot about getting my content done because I was on tour for the past year and it's really hard to do both at the same time. It's great. I don't know how else to say it without sounding like a dick. It's really great. You'll like it.


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Photos courtesy of W Hotels

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Wed, 03 Jul 2019 20:11:10 +0000http://www.wupxae.live/hayley-kiyoko-w-hotels-pride-2639063349.htmlPrideW hotelsMusicLgbtqTravelParadeFloatExpectationsPopHayley kiyokoMatt Moen
HBO's New Series 'Los Espookys' Is Trailblazing In More Ways Than Onehttp://www.wupxae.live/los-espookys-hbo-2639046612.html

New cultural ground is being broken at HBO, as for the first time ever, a Spanish-language series — Los Espookys — is airing on the premium cable network.

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"At first we wanted Los Espookys to be on some of the Spanish-language channels," executive producer Fred Armisen tells us. "But it was explained to me that there aren't a lot of outlets for new Spanish shows, so that's what brought us to HBO. And they suggested putting it on their main channel instead of HBO Latin America… now I'm just so, so happy that it is!"

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Created by Armisen and Brooklyn-based writers Julio Torres (SNL) and Ana Fabrega, the six-part series, running now, is as bizarre a show as HBO has ever created. Executive produced by Armisen and SNL creator Lorne Michaels, Los Espookys is based in an unnamed Latin American country where the strange and eerie are a part of everyday life. The show follows a group of creepy-horror obsessed friends who run a business together, the Los Espookys company, that provides rigged chills and frights to those who want it, or need it, whether that's creating a fake exorcism for a struggling priest or pretending to abduct a US ambassador in exchange for US work visas.

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Formed by the leather clad and lovable Renaldo (played by the excellent Bernardo Velasco), the Espookys troupe includes Andrés (Julio Torres), a brooding heir to a chocolate fortune with an insufferable yet beautiful boyfriend, Juan Carlos (José Pablo Minor); the tenacious Espookys crew hand and part time dental hygienist, úrsula (Cassandra Ciangherotti), who gives sage advice like, "You can't keep making big decisions with your eyes"; and úrsula's sister, Tati (Ana Fabrega), who juggles many truly insane odd jobs (like moving the second hand on a town hall clock or spinning an already-broken desk fan) while acting as the group's test dummy for all their frights. Armisen plays Tico, Renaldo's beloved uncle who is happily living his dream as a parking-valet in LA whose uncanny ability to park any vehicle in any space has made him legendary.

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Los Espookys seems inspired by a diverse set of cultural references, including vintage and modern horror films, film noir, classic telenovela, and, of course, SNL. But Armisen's Emmy-nominated Portlandia could have the most influence of all: the dream-like aesthetic and seemingly random happenings in Los Espookys, although based in a totally separate hemisphere from Oregon, is eerily similar to IFC's eponymous Portland show. The ways in which Portlandia's antagonizing characters were malicious but seemingly benign or how the series regularly blended real life with surreal plotlines is mirrored in the Espookys' misadventures.

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At the same time, Los Espookys blends New York comedy writing with Latin American slapstick humor, a mix of lines delivered with dry, comedic timing with physical comedy that echoes popular Spanish-language comedies like El Chavo del Ocho. The show's creepy yet beautiful designs and colorful cast of characters come together to create a program that's simultaneously offbeat, fanciful, and just a little bit grotesque.

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While Los Espookys isn't particularly spooky, it is creepy — each episode deals at some point with death, gore, the unknown, mysticism, and the peculiar, generally. "We aren't actually huge horror fans," Torres admits to PAPER. "Fred's really the one who is so into it. I think he's most interested by people who are really interested in horror."

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Armisen's interest in horror fans is obvious when you consider two of his darkest characters from Portlandia: Vincent and Jacqueline (played by Portlandia co-star Carrie Brownstein), the goth couple who drive a hearse and are as obsessed with the grizzly and strange as anyone on the crack Los Espookys team.

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"Those were my favorite characters ever. I wanted to live in them," Armisen says. "In one of our Portlandia sketches, Vince is talking about what he wants his funeral to be like, all thunder and lightning and scary. And I really do want my funeral to be terrifying and scary! Los Espookys is like an extension of that energy. It's totally the same sensibilities. It is my hope that they [Vincent and Jacqueline] will one day visit Los Espookys."

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Aside from bringing Spanish language-entertainment styles and sensibilities to American HBO viewers, Los Espookys is a pioneering show for the inclusive and LGBTQ+ friendly perspective it brings to Latin American culture. The show boasts an inclusive cast with mainly female and LGBTQ+ characters as well as a queer protagonist, Andrés, whose blue hair, ultra chic outfits, and ever-distant stares are pulled off with witchy aplomb by Torres.

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"I want it [LGBTQ+ visibility in media] to be the norm so much. It would be nice to get to a place where it's not even noticeable," Armisen says. "Personally, that's what it's become in my life. It's a part of my workday, my everyday, and so I've really grown to love it. That's reflected in Los Espookys. There's a moment in an episode where Andrés and his boyfriend Juan Carlos are discussing getting married so that their two family businesses — chocolate and cookies — can join and become one, but it's a moment that just breezes by. [Their homosexuality is] never treated as a plot point or a 'controversy.' Normalization is the goal, and I think we achieve those goals little by little."

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Now in its first season, you can watch Los Espookys on HBO's main channel and all corresponding streaming platforms every Friday night at 11:00-11:30 p.m. ET/PT.

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Splash photo: Bernardo Velasco as Renaldo. Cassandra Ciangherotti as úrsula. Julio Torres as Andres in Los Espookys. Photo courtesy of HBO.

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Wed, 03 Jul 2019 19:44:35 +0000http://www.wupxae.live/los-espookys-hbo-2639046612.htmlTvLos espookysJulio torresLatinxHboLgbtqFred armisenAlex Blynn
Nicole Dennis-Benn's 'Patsy' Is a Complex Portrait of Black Queer Womenhttp://www.wupxae.live/nicole-dennis-benn-patsy-novel-2639074068.html

Ever since her critically lauded debut novel, Here Comes the Sun, novelist Nicole Dennis-Benn has been wielding her fiction as a tool of disruption — one that seeks to upend conventional storytelling and depict the layered complexity of her protagonists. Her sophomore novel, Patsy, out now from Liveright, is an unfettered examination of queerness, reluctant motherhood, the immigrant experience, and, on top of it all, the opportunity for redemption.

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Related | Jacob Tobia: 'Gender Is Simple for Nobody'

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Patsy wants more for herself. America not only beckons her with opportunity, for the chance to put herself first, but also promises to reunite her with her oldest friend, Cicely, and the possibility to rekindle their young love. After years of longing to leave Pennyfield, the Jamaican town where she was raised, Patsy finally gets her visa approved. She leaves her five-year-old daughter, Tru, in the care of her father and his new family, to begin life anew in Brooklyn, only to discover life is not at all what Cicely has described in her letters to her. Patsy is a story that concurrently follows mother and daughter, over the span of a decade, as they both contend with identity and sexuality, and, ultimately, try to establish a relationship that has previously remained absent.

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Nicole Dennis-Benn talked to PAPER about her second novel, which is already deemed a literary triumph by both readers and critics, below.

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There are a number of facets to Patsy's identity: she's a mother, a queer woman, and an immigrant. Was she initially conceived with all of these aspects in mind, all at once, or were they pieced together?

Patsy's queerness was not apparent to me in my first couple drafts of the story. Also, her reluctance as a mother was not fully apparent to me either. The first drafts consisted of Patsy simply leaving Jamaica with good intentions of sending back money for her family — that which is usually expected of individuals migrating to a country with more resources. But as I re-wrote the manuscript, I realize that I've seen and heard those stories too many times—that of the "good altruistic immigrant." I found myself falling into the same monotony of writing the type of story that would depict our humanity to people who don't necessarily care for us, but who we want to impress. For America is deemed "the promised land" where Black and Brown immigrants have to prove our morality in order to be regarded as human beings. In Patsy, I wrote against that, becoming more open to the narrative of her being a queer, reluctant mother, and challenging myself to tap into the complexity of her seeking the freedom and opportunity to find her place in the world on her own.

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Early on, Patsy discloses that she has never really loved her daughter, Tru, "like she's supposed to, or like her daughter loves her," and it's hard not to judge her. But the more I read, the more compassion I felt towards Patsy. Did you also feel this way writing her?

I judged Patsy at first. I didn't know that I was doing it until I found myself delaying the process and re-writing to make sense of where the narrative was taking me. In my mind I could not conceive of a woman abandoning her young daughter and dare express her lack of desire to embrace the role of motherhood. However, after some time, I did some soul searching that made me question my own internalized judgements and expectations of what a mother ought to be. It's not only assumed that every woman should aspire to the role of motherhood, but when/if they become mothers, they should automatically be good at it. People give mothers this unfair, high standard they ought to live up to, disregarding the fact that they are still human, full of wants and desires, and the ability to fumble and make mistakes.

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"Growing up in Jamaica in a working-class family, I never saw myself in books. Therefore, now that I have the opportunity to tell our stories, I choose to write about my people and our untold stories."

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You explore motherhood in a culture that expects it of a woman, and if a woman doesn't fill that role, especially in a particular class, she is deemed a pariah. Did you have any trepidation critiquing parts of your culture, and if so, how did you contend with it?

I had long outgrown that trepidation of critiquing parts of my culture. However, motherhood is a universal theme. Not just relevant to Jamaican culture. A woman without children is considered a pariah anywhere. And a rung lower than a woman with no children is the woman who openly expresses her lack of desire to have children.

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You take on a slew of challenges through Patsy — reluctance towards motherhood, confronting sexual identity, navigating the harsh realities of immigration, all on top of one sacrifice after another — yet there is a sense of hopefulness coursing underneath, especially towards the end. Did you intend it this way, or did this happen through circumstance?

I don't believe in one dimensional stories and one dimensional characters. Like human beings who have contradictions and internal conflicts, characters ought to have them too in order to feel authentic. This is why it took me a while to write the book, because Patsy is a layered character, and so is Tru. Despite all the odds against mother and daughter, the story itself is about redemption.

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Let's talk about language as identity. What message are you sending to your readers by writing dialogue in Jamaican patois? How does it strengthen our connection to the characters, even if a reader isn't familiar with the dialect?

As Jamaicans we were taught to be ashamed of our language. Most of us were forbidden to speak Patois in school. However, language is identity. Therefore, to be told not to speak our language is a complete disregard of who we are as a people. As a writer, I reclaim our language by using it in dialect. Given that I'm writing Jamaican characters, it is important to me to write them as authentic as possible. It is also important to me to know that I'm not only writing my people on the page for them to see themselves, but hear themselves as well. For the reader who is unfamiliar with the language, it forces them to slow down a bit and become acquainted with it.

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Why was it important to tell this story from a working-class perspective?

Toni Morrison once said that we should write the books we want to read. That's exactly what I've been doing. Growing up in Jamaica in a working-class family, I never saw myself in books. Therefore, now that I have the opportunity to tell our stories, I choose to write about my people and our untold stories.

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Your fiction is a powerful tool just as much as it is a magnetic revelation. Would you ever release a non-fiction collection?

Maybe someday I might get around to writing a memoir. Right now, I feel I have more freedom with fiction. I have the license to spin stories and invent characters I can always hide behind.

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Patsy is available for purchase here.

Author photo courtesy of Jason Berger

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Wed, 03 Jul 2019 18:47:14 +0000http://www.wupxae.live/nicole-dennis-benn-patsy-novel-2639074068.htmlNicole dennis-bennPatsyBookLgbtqGreg Mania
FaceTime Just Changed Foreverhttp://www.wupxae.live/facetime-attention-correction-2639073850.html

Ah, FaceTime. Literally Apple invented a cutting edge video call feature designed to increase human connection, and we all just used it to stare at ourselves instead of the person we're speaking with. Have you ever made direct eye contact with someone during a FaceTime call? No, you absolutely have not. But that's about to change.

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Tech journalist and app developer Mike Rundle is currently beta testing iOS 13, and he shared over Twitter that FaceTime will soon have an optional "FaceTime Attention Correction" feature that uses augmented reality to visually change the direction someone's eyes are facing on screen, and create a more perfect illusion of face-to-face contact. He correctly calls it "some next-century shit."

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Related | Behold Drake's Diamond-Encrusted iPhone Case

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Rundle demonstrated how attention correction works with the help of fellow developer Will Sigmon:


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Okay. This is so clever and, also, so creepy! Rundle was looking at Sigmon's face, rather than his iPhone camera, but screenshots show them making "eye contact." The effect isn't completely realistic, but is definitely believable enough.

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Related | Is the New iPhone Sexist?

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The feature is currently showing up on new models of iPhone XS and XS Max, but a larger rollout is expected. And there are presumably more AR Apple features to come — at this point, we're only a couple of steps away from using deepfakes to "call our moms."

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I'm moving to a deserted island with no cell reception! Bye.

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Photo via Getty

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Wed, 03 Jul 2019 18:15:54 +0000http://www.wupxae.live/facetime-attention-correction-2639073850.htmlAugmented realityArAppleTechTechnologySmartphonesIphoneIosTwitterAttention correctionSelfiesFacetimeKatherine Gillespie
Follow or Be Lost: @Sommerrayhttp://www.wupxae.live/interview-sommer-ray-2639071207.html

You see someone's face on your feed every day, but do you really know them? Follow or Be Lost is an ongoing series where we find out fast facts about the internet's most popular people.

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Twenty two-year-old Colorado native Sommer Ray is the queen of fitness Instagram. Since breaking out on the platform in 2015, she's amassed 21.2 million followers and posted an enviable grid full of photos and workout videos. Paris Hilton and Bella Thorne are mutuals.

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Related | Follow or Be Lost: @Amouranth

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Ray has her own swimwear line, a popular YouTube channel, and even her finsta ("the real me") has 3.5 million loyal fans. Here's what else to know about her.

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Age/Gender/Location?

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22/female/LA.

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What's your star sign, and do you fit the stereotypes?

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Virgo! And only some!


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According to Facebook, what's your childhood crush up to these days?

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Hahah, honestly I don't even have the Facebook app on my phone.

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What role do you usually play in the group chat?

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The inappropriate one, and it's funny 'cause I'm always the most innocent.


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What makes you happiest?

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My happiest days are on the back of a horse! It's the most freeing feeling.

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What makes you saddest?

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My mom sold my horse when I moved to LA ):

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What's the last TV show you binged?

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True Detective.


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You're a college professor. What subject do you teach?

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Hmmm, maybe sports research.

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What's your greatest fear?

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I'm not scared of heights, bugs or snakes or spiders — I actually have a pet tarantula. Im pretty fearless, so this is a hard one... hmm, I'm scared of having regrets when I'm old.

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Have you ever been in love?

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Yesss.


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What's your first memory of the internet?

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I used to use Instagram as a photo editor when it first came out, like put the filters on my photos, but I wouldn't post anything.

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What's your favorite breakfast cereal?

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Honey Graham Oh's.


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What's your proudest achievement?

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All the years of NPC competing I did when I was super young. Took a tonne of hard work and discipline.

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Name your three desert island beauty products.

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Jojoba oil, sunscreen for my face, lip balm.

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What was your favorite song when you were 13 years old?

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"Glamorous" by Fergie.


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What's the last thing you spent more than $10 on?

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I just ordered the 23andme test.

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What do you do for self-care?

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Baths lol, I love baths with epsom salts and lavender essential oil. It's really the most relaxing thing for me. It's my therapy, I can sit in there for hours.


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Copy and paste the last text/DM you sent.

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"Too bad it's happening IN THIS UNIVERSE"

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You're leaving the house in a rush. Which pair of sneakers do you reach for?

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White Air Force 1s.

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Who will you never unfollow?

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My mom, lol.

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What was the last lie you told?

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I'll call you back.

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Photo via Instagram

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Wed, 03 Jul 2019 17:06:49 +0000http://www.wupxae.live/interview-sommer-ray-2639071207.htmlSommer rayInstagramFitness modelInfluencerSportsBodybuildingSocial mediaInterviewQ&aFollow or be lostKatherine Gillespie
Rosalía Drops Two New Singles On Ushttp://www.wupxae.live/rosala-money-man-2639072872.html

The summer of Rosalía continues, and thank God. The Catalan musician just released "Fucking Money Man," a bundle of two new tracks: "Milionària" ("Millionare") and "Dio$ No$ Libre Del Dinero" ("God Free Us From The Money"). Socialist flamenco! We simply must stan.

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"Fucking Money Man" comes with a fun two-part music video directed by Bàrbara Farré, featuring a game show with a money booth and Rosalía donning a matador outfit. It's so much fun. Welcome to the long weekend!

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Related | The Nail Artist Behind Rosalía's Gilded Claws in 'Aute Cuture'

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The new songs follow hot on the heels of Rosalía's last music video, for "Aute Couture," in which she beckoned listeners with long gilded claws. She's also kept busy teasing us about a possible romance with Bad Bunny, and performing at Glastonbury.

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Watch the new video for Rosalía's "Fucking Money Man," below.


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Image via Instagram

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Wed, 03 Jul 2019 17:00:33 +0000http://www.wupxae.live/rosala-money-man-2639072872.htmlMusicFucking money manMilionàriaDio$ no$ libre del dineroGod free us from the moneyLatinxSpainCatalanMusic videoBàrbara farréBad bunnySpanishRosalíaKatherine Gillespie
Fans React to Nicki Minaj Performing in Saudi Arabiahttp://www.wupxae.live/nicki-minaj-saudi-arabia-live-2639072070.html

Today, in a move to shed years of entertainment restrictions, the ultra-conservative Saudi Arabian kingdom announced that hip-hop provocateur Nicki Minaj will perform there.

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Minaj is slated to headline Jeddah World Fest on July 18, an event that is reportedly "in line with Saudi laws and is alcohol and drug-free," according to Stereogum. The festival is "open to people 16 and older and will take place at the King Abdullah Sports Stadium in the Red Sea city." According to the Associated Press, Saudi organizers also said the concert will be broadcast globally and covered by MTV.

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Related | Break the Internet: Nicki Minaj

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Other performers scheduled to appear include Liam Payne and DJ Steve Aoki. The kingdom is also promising quick electronic visas for international visitors who want to attend.

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Reactions online have yielded everything from excitement to criticism. One viral video posted to Twitter is of a Saudi woman protesting the Saudi government for inviting Minaj — who famously has sexually explicit lyrics and performances — to appear, while forcing women attending the concert to wear a modest full-length robe, called the abaya. Most Saudi women cover their hair and faces with veils.

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"She's going to go and shake her ass and all her songs are indecent and about sex and shaking ass and then you tell me to wear the abaya," the Saudi woman says. "What the hell?"


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While it is currently unclear what Minaj's thoughts are, or if what she plans to wear during her show will uphold Saudi tradition or not, the kingdom is clearly attempting to rectify its reputation. In recent months, acts like Mariah Carey, Enrique Iglesias, the Black Eyed Peas, rapper Sean Paul, and DJs David Guetta and Tiesto have performed in Saudi Arabia.

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Related | Saudi Arabia Officially Lifts Ban on Women Drivers

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Last October, Saudi Arabia received widespread international backlash over the state-sanctioned murder of Saudi critic and writer Jamal Khashoggi close to the crown prince in the kingdom's consulate in Turkey.





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And in the recent past, Saudi establishments playing loud music were reportedly still being raided by officials. Elsewhere, gender segregation between single men and women is still enforced in many public spaces, including restaurants, coffee shops, public schools and universities, while other rules have changed, with women now allowed to drive and attend events in sports stadiums.

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Photo via Getty

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Wed, 03 Jul 2019 16:33:26 +0000http://www.wupxae.live/nicki-minaj-saudi-arabia-live-2639072070.htmlSaudi arabiaJeddah world festSteve aokiLiam payneNicki minajMichael Love Michael
Carly Rae Jepsen, Release 'Disco Sweat' Nowhttp://www.wupxae.live/carly-rae-jepsen-disco-sweat-2639070555.html

Carly Rae Jepsen, pop's reigning master of love songs, is giving us the business, and Dedicated has only been out for a little over a month.

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In a new interview with SF Weekly, the acclaimed singer/songwriter reveals that she made a full album called Disco Sweat while recording the songs that would ultimately form her just-released fourth studio effort. But don't get too excited. Jepsen says it will "probably never be released, and shouldn't." J'excuse? Disco is the perfect genre for Jepsen to channel, and the perfect visual era to reference. Sorry, but we hard disagree.

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Related | Party For Two: Carly Rae Jepsen and Tan France on Love

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Jepsen goes on to say that her intentions when recording it were to make a breezy disco album, which frankly couldn't be more on-brand for the nostalgia-leaning pop queen. "I started off with a very strong intention to make an understated disco, living room dance party thing," she said, adding that the album was inspired by "going to Sweden and really digging into some ABBA stuff."

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And while Jepsen said the album won't likely see the light of day anytime soon, if ever, she says Dedicated has hints of the direction she was headed in with Disco Sweat. She said she wanted to play with multiple styles rather than limiting herself exclusively to '70s disco.

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"I think there are songs on the new album that achieved kinda what I was envisioning, I think 'Julien' is a good example of that," Jepsen explains, going to to say that Disco Sweat will "be buried in my backyard."

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Well, fans, while we'd never encourage trespassing, who's game for a little digging? Jepsen's only option to stop intrepid fans from getting all up in her grill is to release Disco Sweat immediately, right? Makes sense to me!

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Revisit Dedicated, below, and her PAPER Pride cover story here.


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Photography: Julian Buchan for PAPER

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Wed, 03 Jul 2019 15:29:09 +0000http://www.wupxae.live/carly-rae-jepsen-disco-sweat-2639070555.htmlDedicatedDisco sweatAlbumNew albumCarly rae jepsenMichael Love Michael
Lil Nas X Responds to Homophobes After Coming Outhttp://www.wupxae.live/lil-nas-x-homophobes-response-2639065073.html

Lil Nas X — the viral hitmaker behind the chart-topping "Old Town Road" — is now having to defend himself against homophobic online trolls.

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On the last day of Pride month, the rapper subtly came out via Twitter.

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Related | How Yeehaw Took Over the Internet

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"some of y'all already know, some of y'all don't care, some of y'all not gone fwm no more. but before this month ends i want y'all to listen closely to c7osure," he wrote. Lil Nas then followed up with another tweet saying he "thought i made it obvious" alongside a photo of his album cover, which features a building lit up with a rainbow.

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And just in case there was any confusion, Lil Nas X then responded to speculation with a series of tweets showcasing his signature brand of meme-loving humor.

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And though the response to his announcement appears to be overwhelmingly positive, since this is the internet, there had to be at least a few shitty homophobes in the comments — with some making nasty comments about how the "Old Town Road" line about how he's "gonna ride 'til I can't no more" was an allusion to his sexual orientation.

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Unfortunately, things got even uglier in his Instagram comments. Under a post celebrating "Old Town Road's" historic Billboard run, trolls piled on, writing things such as "Bruh why you gay" and "someone I looked up too [sic] as a great person who makes dope music turned gay. smh."

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View this post on Instagram

CRAZY DAY ??

A post shared by Lil Nas X (@lilnasx) on

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In true Lil Nas X fashion though, the rapper spent a good amount of time outsmarting responding to a few of the homophobes.

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Sadly, it appears as if the harassment has begun to take a toll on Lil Nas X, if a few of his latest posts are any indication.

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View this post on Instagram

say one more home of phobic thing to me

A post shared by Lil Nas X (@lilnasx) on

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Thankfully though, it seems as if he's getting a lot of support from fellow musicians and fans — including MNEK and Pose star Dominique Jackson. See their tweets, below.

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Photo via Getty

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Wed, 03 Jul 2019 01:14:31 +0000http://www.wupxae.live/lil-nas-x-homophobes-response-2639065073.htmlLil nas xHomophobiaLgbtqMusicDominique jacksonMnekPete buttigiegFamous peopleSandra Song
Sia Accused of Using Blackface By Taylor Swift Fanshttp://www.wupxae.live/sia-blackface-taylor-swift-fans-2639064849.html

Sia is currently being accused of using blackface in the past by Taylor Swift fans.

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Related | The Taylor Swift and Scooter Braun Beef, Explained

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Yesterday, Sia came to Scooter Braun's defense via Twitter, writing that he's "a good kind man." Braun is currently embroiled in a high-profile feud with Swift after he acquired her master recordings — a move that led Swift to call him out for the "incessant, manipulative bullying I've received at his hands for years" via her Tumblr.

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And though Sia wasn't the only celebrity to defend Braun, Swift's fans zeroed in on the star and dredged up old concert footage of Sia performing with her face and neck covered in black paint.

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In response to the criticism, Sia followed up with a tweet addressing Swift's fans, alongside a video of one of the performances.

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"For the swift fans trying to make out that I would ever do blackface please see this video," she wrote. "I was painting myself into the backdrop, it was a precursor to the wig…"

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See Sia's response in its entirety, below.

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Photo via Getty

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Wed, 03 Jul 2019 00:36:56 +0000http://www.wupxae.live/sia-blackface-taylor-swift-fans-2639064849.htmlSiaTaylor swiftScooter braunCheap thrillsFamous peopleMusicSandra Song
Nike Cancels 'Betsy Ross Flag' Sneaker After Colin Kaepernick Criticismhttp://www.wupxae.live/nike-betsy-ross-kaepernick-2639064436.html

Nike has announced that it is officially cancelling the release of a special edition Air Max 1 Quick Strike sneaker featuring Betsy Ross' 13-star flag — a symbol that's more recently been co-opted by white supremacist groups.

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Earlier today, Nike spokesperson Sandra Carreon-John issued a statement saying that the brand had decided to "halt distribution ... based on concerns that it could unintentionally offend and detract from the nation's patriotic holiday."

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But according to The New York Times, a source says that the cancellation reportedly came after Nike brand ambassador and former NFL quarterback Colin Kaepernick — who began kneeling during "The Star-Spangled Banner" to protest racial inequity and police brutality — privately reached out to the brand to criticize the use of Ross' design.

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The source also said that Kaepernick "expressed the concern to the company that the Betsy Ross flag had been co-opted by groups espousing racist ideologies," as the 13-star flag has more recently been used on Ku Klux Klan recruiting material and has appeared at neo-Nazi rallies, per Today.

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"Historically, these symbols have been used by white supremacists, both to hearken back to a time when black people were enslaved, while also painting themselves as the inheritors of the 'true' American tradition," Southern Poverty Law Center Interim Research Director Keegan Hankes explained to Today. "More recently, white nationalist groups such as Patriot Front and the American Identity Movement (formerly Identity Evropa) have branded themselves in the trappings of Americana with the aim of creating a more marketable image."

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That said, the abrupt cancellation of the sneaker has led to ample conservative criticism, including from Texas Senator Ted Cruz and Arizona Governor Doug Ducey, the latter of whom has said he will no longer support the building of a proposed Nike facility in Goodyear, Arizona.

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Kaepernick has yet to publicly comment on Nike's decision.

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Photo courtesy of Nike

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Wed, 03 Jul 2019 00:14:07 +0000http://www.wupxae.live/nike-betsy-ross-kaepernick-2639064436.htmlNikeColin kaepernickSneakersFashionRacismJuly 4NflWhite supremacistsSandra Song
Munch on Baguettes While Shopping Fendi Baguetteshttp://www.wupxae.live/fendi-cafe-2639057480.html

From Jacquemus to Prada, opening a bespoke cafe experience has become all the rage among fashion's upper echelon, and understandably so. Everybody loves a little something to nosh on while perusing this season's most coveted bags (that is unless you're dripping crumbs into a Birkin, in which case you will promptly get escorted out of the airport Hermès), which is why Fendi is now getting in on the action.

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Related | Carrie Bradshaw's Iconic Fendi Baguette Bag Is Back

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As part of their summer takeover of British department store Harrods, the Italian fashion label is launching their latest pop-up, Fendi Caffe, which will offer a small selection of Italian delicacies, desserts, beverages, and plenty of Baguettes, the brand's iconic handbag. This isn't Fendi's first foray into the culinary world, having introduced a limited line of cute branded popsicles at Selfridges last summer. In addition to being a full-service eatery, the pop-up will also feature a Peekaboo bag to let shoppers customize and create their own version of the namesake bag before buying.


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To help furnish the café, Fendi has tapped LA artist Joshua Vides to give everything from the plates to the pantry a taste of his signature monochrome pop-art treatment. In a sneak preview posted to the artist's Instagram, there are glimpses of the retro minimalist café along with shots of sketches of skateboard decks and plates emblazoned with the Fendi logo coming to life in Vides' studio. The collaboration also extends to a limited edition bag, blanket, and prints made from re-purposed Fendi campaign ads made by Vides that will also be a part of the pop-up

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The Fendi Caffe will be open to the public through August 31st at Harrods in London.


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Photo via Instagram

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Tue, 02 Jul 2019 21:55:30 +0000http://www.wupxae.live/fendi-cafe-2639057480.htmlBaguetteCafeFashionHarrodsJoshua videsArtPop-upFendiMatt Moen
Ariana Grande Could Save the Presidential Electionhttp://www.wupxae.live/ariana-grande-voter-registration-2639062055.html

Pop stars... could save us all? After Taylor Swift's sudden pivot to politics encouraged mass youth voter registration in the lead up to last year's midterms, Ariana Grande is here to do the same thing for 2020's presidential election. Her Sweetener US tour has registered more voters than that of any other artist since 2008.

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Grande announced a partnership with non-profit HeadCount when she hit the road back in March, and the organization has set up a registration booth served by volunteers at every single tour stop. Participants receive exclusive "Thank U, Next Gen" stickers, in Grande-approved pastel colorways.


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As the popstar explained via Instagram at the beginning of her tour, concertgoers who aren't able to register on site can simply text "Ariana" to 40649 and receive further instruction about getting enrolled. Easy.


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HeadCount told CNBC that it has registered more than 17,000 voters in 2019, which is more than during any other year before a presidential election. Alongside the Sweetener tour, it has also seen success during festivals like Bonnaroo.

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Rock the vote, kids! No, really. Rock the Vote has also experienced a massive influx of new voter registrations. 2020 is going to be a big one.

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Photo via Instagram

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Tue, 02 Jul 2019 21:40:47 +0000http://www.wupxae.live/ariana-grande-voter-registration-2639062055.htmlMusicSweetenerThank u nextHeadcountRock the voteYouth votingDonald trumpPresidential election2020PopTaylor swiftThankunextgenAriana grandeKatherine Gillespie
JUJ and Vic Mensa on Their New Collaboration and Staying Realhttp://www.wupxae.live/juj-vic-mensa-mood-2639017185.html

Rising 19-year-old pop artist JUJ just released her debut EP, JUJ, It's U, an empowering collection culled from the effortlessly, feel-good sounds and styles of mid-'90s R&B.

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On bittersweet lead single "Mood," the singer-songwriter from Philadelphia weighs the pros and cons of moving to Los Angeles to pursue her music career. Ultimately, she decides that her dreams won't come true without action.

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Related | Vic Mensa: Hometown Hero

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And it seems those dreams are rapidly coming to fruition: recently, she worked with revived streetwear brand, Champion for a sold-out collaboration. Just last week, JUJ released a new version of "Mood," on which Chicago rapper Vic Mensa lays down his own verse detailing his experience pursuing his dreams with vivid, somber detail.

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Listen to the track, below. Also, JUJ and Vic Mensa talk to each other about transitioning from underground to mainstream success, writing truthfully, and overcoming obstacles.


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JUJ: I'm so excited about the new "Mood" verse. I just wanted to hear your thoughts about when you first heard it and how the verse inspired you?

Vic Mensa: You know, I first connected with "Mood" when I heard it. When you're speaking about moving to California, the fears or other people's fears and doubts associated with breaking out of a shell. That's something I can relate to. Because most people that I grew up with never left. They're still in Chicago, so that's the place I went to when I started writing my verse. I usually write things in the studio, but with this one I was just walking around the house thinking about what it was like when I left home significantly for the first time. When I was 17 years old and I started going out on the road. People's expectations, limitations, and the boundaries they wanted to put on me were the things that I set out to overcome. Those are the things that I was inspired to write about.

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JUJ: Did you ever have doubts about leaving while being in Chicago? Doubts about moving out to LA when you were 17?

Mensa: I didn't move to LA when I was 17. I just started moving around. I always knew for me to go where I wanted to in my life that I was gonna have to leave home. I keep such a strong connection to home. I do so many things in Chicago, but sometimes it's better for me to be a little bit outside the situation to be more impactful.

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"I don't know many people who have a similar situation to us moving away from home to pursue a career at 17." — JUJ

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JUJ: Yeah. I don't know many people who have a similar situation to us moving away from home to pursue a career at 17, so when I heard your verse it felt very authentic to my story about the struggles and hardships. There's not many people who have experienced that, so it really touched me.

Mensa: Word up!

JUJ: I was telling my team that during my freshman and sophomore year of high school "Liquor Locker" [from your 2016 album, There's Alot Going On] was the song of those years.

Mensa: Wow! That's what's up. That's super dope!

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JUJ: That was super big on the East Coast and a huge thing. You really impacted rap a lot on the east coast with that song. I just wanted to ask if you had any advice or anything to say on your come up from the underground to mainstream?

Mensa: I think that as time has past for me, the goal and the trajectory has been to come closer into myself. Trying to maintain the motivations that inspired me to make music in the first place. The necessity to describe things happening in the world around me. To make sense of them, to make sense of my emotions and my relationships. Those are the things that really galvanized me to pick up a pen in the first place. And as more attention or fortune has come my way, it's been a process of maintaining myself and staying [true to] myself... So JUJ, how is it for you being a new artist or having a breakout moment right now?

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JUJ: Well, I feel like it's been something I've been anticipating my whole life. Like you're saying, if there's always been something in me that feels like I want to do more, and was bound to move away, and take everything I've learned from my roots and use it. For instance, my music. I'm trying not to be another 19-year-old writing relationship songs. I'm trying to write about some social issues. Whether it's challenging my generation to rise above the norm or like you with immigration [in your new video "Camp America"]. I'm not trying to be another breakup, relationship artist that gets thrown away on the side with the rest. Has there been anything significant in your life that you'd say you had to overcome that impacted your career?

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"I had a lot of issues with drugs and everything that comes along with a quote-unquote rock star lifestyle. Those things can start to consume you." — Vic Mensa

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Mensa: Addiction is probably the first thing that comes to mind. I had a lot of issues with drugs and everything that comes along with a quote-unquote rock star lifestyle. Those things can start to consume you. They transform you. At a point in time, I found myself feeling very reliant on drugs, alcohol, and other things to function or feel okay. I realized there was a problem. So many young artists are passing away right now from fentanyl [overdoses].

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JUJ: Do you feel like this shaped your career in any way?

Mensa: I feel like as a human being knowing addiction is something that gives you a kinship to other addicts and a specific perspective on the world. You know what it's like to be in that position, so I think that 100 percent shaped parts of me as a human, and then by proxy as an artist, as well.

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Photography: Doryn Fine

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Tue, 02 Jul 2019 20:38:23 +0000http://www.wupxae.live/juj-vic-mensa-mood-2639017185.htmlJujVic mensaMoodFashionMusicChampionMichael Love Michael
New Life AI Is the Social Network Validating Cultural Clouthttp://www.wupxae.live/new-life-ai-2639055192.html

Since its inception, the internet (and, by extension, social media) has been hailed as a tool of the revolution — something that democratizes information and allows for unfettered access to varying perspectives. However, in the past few years, things like influencer culture and advertising have made the online sphere become increasingly tied to monetization which, in turn, has fostered a level of dishonesty and inauthenticity. That said, a new "post-capitalist network" known as New Life AI is here to change that all.

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The brainchild of Vector Newman, New Life seeks to facilitate the exposure of authentic cultural capital — completely isolated from the influences of advertisers or external interests. Utilizing a form of value that "combines the virtues of cryptocurrency with the virtues of redistribution," New Life doesn't incentivize users with a currency based on a consumable resource, like Bitcoin's reliance on computing power. Instead, New Life's currency is about creating a way of promoting your creative output in a quantifiable way that has the potential to speak to and "educate the corporate world."

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Related | 10 Social Media Personalities Making the Most Noise

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A nebulous concept, indeed, but in order to understand how it works, we need to explain how New Life came about. Noticing that "social media is completely aligned with the way industrialism works" — in the sense that what matters to tech giants is the amount of users and engagement rather than intent or purpose — Newman's goal was to create a platform that measured the kind of meaningful social capital valued by some of the internet's most in-the-know and interconnected artistic groups.

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"Aesthetics drive brilliance in the economy, but it's kind of a taboo topic that no one in the financial sector will talk about."

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"Aesthetics drive brilliance in the economy, but it's kind of a taboo topic that no one in the financial sector will talk about," he explains. "We want to create the kind of value that is not tangible, not recognized by the economy." As such, New Life operates under a model that values quality over quantity — one that "isn't about how many people follow you," but about who. As an example of this, Newman points toward the difference in the way the subculture-driven creative world interacts with public figures like Beyoncé versus people like Arca.

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"Looking at Beyoncé, I have 70 people who I follow, following her... Arca has 300 people who I follow following them," Newman explains. "It almost seems as if Arca is 3000 times more influential than Beyoncé, but if you look at the 'actual' numbers she has 1000 times more followers."

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And though his argument surrounding Beyoncé's cultural capital is a somewhat trickier than if we were looking at something such as, say, Miley Cyrus, Newman's point remains. After all, if we were to compare Cyrus' artistic innovation with Arca's cultural contributions, it becomes obvious that "no one is actually looking at things [through the lens of actual cultural impact]."

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"Aesthetics and all this stuff is very secondary stuff to investors, they don't really understand logic, they just see its growing," he adds. "They don't talk to designers. The market [as-is] doesn't care about the vision of designers and creators." And it's New Life's mission to redistribute this power — to "allow the people who actually participate in the collective creation of aesthetics to get some value back."

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"We are really focused on the new aesthetics economy, which attaches economic value to competence in terms of creation and curation."

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So in a world where only celebrities and big brands make money from relatively shallow metrics, New Life prioritizes a different sort of "engagement" — one that rewards "exposure relies on level of competence of user rather than number of users, which can be [altered]," per Newman.

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Rather than using quantitative metrics such as page views, number of users, or user engagement — all tangible, data-driven points that, as we've seen, can easily be gamed — New Life allows users to "vote" on posts highlighting new creative endeavors. Whether it be a new animation, clothing design, or piece of music, all you have to do is hold down the post for an amount of time that correlates to your interest in the piece. The longer you press down, the more credence you give the work — a format that in way forces a more interactive engagement with the work and makes "scrolling through the feed" feel more like a video game of sorts.

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"Sometimes on Instagram, they don't even cheat, but they have the kind of user who doesn't interact, they don't create any economic value. They just want to see them everyday, because they are used to it. There's no actual creative value," Newman explains. "We are really focused on the new aesthetics economy, which attaches economic value to competence in terms of creation and curation."


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In this way, Newman enjoys the "new Tumblr" comparisons. Not only is New Life much more repost-friendly — unlike Instagram — there's also a "very post-internet vibe" present on the platform, which currently features a hyper-exclusive membership approval model. After all, in Newman's eyes, "a platform that works as a platform that understands the way these communities have to be built." Just look at Instagram's start amongst a "core group of hipsters taking lomography," which obviously expanded to where it is today.

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"Today, [you have to be] very niche," he explains. "What works is when you have a strong connection to small group." And in New Life's case, it's all about the up-and-coming creatives with the potential to shift the cultural narrative for years to come.

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"Our algorithm establishes clout, which is not the amount of people, because we don't follow industrial logic. We value quality or skill."

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"Our algorithm establishes clout, which is not the amount of people, because we don't follow industrial logic. We value quality or skill," Newman says, before explaining the inner workings of their AQ (aka Aesthetics Quotient) measure. "It's a form that intelligence that anyone can have, from anywhere in the world."

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In this way, it's a social network that's working to deprioritize the Western, Eurocentric chokehold on the creative world, as the people with "higher aesthetic intelligence whop have the power," don't necessarily have to "just be from New York or London or Paris."

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"I see a lot of very creative people who are restricted by means, like funding," Newman says. "We all have rent to pay, so if we cannot find backing for innovation we just comply with existing order."

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Check out New Life AI here.

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Welcome to "Internet Explorer," a column by Sandra Song about everything Internet. From meme histories to joke format explainers to collections of some of Twitter's finest roasts, "Internet Explorer" is here to keep you up-to-date with the web's current obsessions — no matter how nonsensical or nihilistic.

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Tue, 02 Jul 2019 15:02:55 +0000http://www.wupxae.live/new-life-ai-2639055192.htmlInternetAiSocial mediaTumblrArtificial intelligenceTechnologyInternet explorerVector newmanSandra Song
Emilia Fart: She's That Girlhttp://www.wupxae.live/emilia-fart-2639044264.html

The doorbell rings, and before I can get the door, Emilia Fart has already let herself in. Sporting her signature robe (this one's emerald green with a cluster of silver brooches adorning the front), neck scarf and feather boa beneath a faux fur jacket, Emilia skips the standard Montreal double-cheek kiss and greets me with a hug. A fitting entrance for this Canadian YouTube star whose loyal following has been built upon a simple yet seemingly impossible concept for many of us: giving yourself permission to take up space.

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"I think it's just me expressing myself in different ways, and sometimes it's absurdist, and sometimes it's just sobbing on my bed," says Emilia when asked to describe her videos. "It's taking everything inward and putting it outward in a way that I find entertaining."

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Emilia's videos include uncomfortably honest confessionals about the often-hidden realities of existing daily with depression, anxiety and insecurity. Moreover, much of Emilia Fart's intrigue could be attributed to her almost compulsive willingness to process her emotions exactly how we're not supposed to — publicly — as displayed in the unabashed spectacle of vlogs such as "Going to America to have a breakdown," in which she dupes an unsuspecting friend into filming her twerking, sprawling, wandering and eating pizza around various public spaces in Vermont. No matter the setting, Emilia's videos frequently involve three common themes: food, fear and feelings. Oh, and her bathtub.

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"This has always been inside me."

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Whether staged in her bedroom or at the grocery store, Emilia's videos are guaranteed to be both cringe-inducingly audacious and strikingly vulnerable. In a medium where even the realest reality is heavily curated, these qualities — along with her unapologetically anti-fashion aesthetic — lead many viewers to assume she's simply playing a character. But Emilia Fart's videos are not the zany adventures of a fictional character. Rather, they are the candid, messy realities of a 29-year-old queer girl from Oakville, Ontario.

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"I can understand why people would think me being hyper in videos is a character. It's not," explains Emilia. "My clothes, that actually annoys me more," she adds, referring to the commonly held belief that what she chooses to wear on camera isn't what she wears in her everyday life.

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Related | Tierra Whack: Wow, Her Mind

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Much of Emilia's content revolves around themes of her own body image and personal style (her video "Why I dress like an obese, deranged Judge Judy" has garnered over 1.5 million views), and with good reason: Her flamboyant, personalized uniform isn't the outer layer of a contrived persona; it's an homage to doing what makes you feel good.

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Emilia's most popular video, "Showing what I looked like when I was normal," is a darkly funny and painfully relatable chronological documentation of her style evolution. She paints the picture of a young girl lacking self-awareness ("2001. Eleven. A lesbian stance before you know what the word lesbian means") who blooms into a miserable adolescent ("2006. Sixteen. Sad and malnourished") and gradually finds her way to a style that works for her ("2010. Twenty. The beginning of the forever scarf").

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"I will be as loud and take as much space as I can."

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Emilia explains that her unconventional chosen ensemble isn't the product of building walls around herself; rather, it's what she achieved when she was able to discard her own expectations of what she should look like. "I haven't always looked like this, but this has always been inside me," explains Emilia in the video.

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Her journey of self-acceptance didn't just begin when she started uploading videos regularly in the summer of 2016. Emilia cites YouTube stars Trisha Paytas, Shane Dawson and Drew Monson as having sparked her love for the medium through their raw honesty, and she credits a session with her therapist for finally allowing herself to admit that she wanted to try making her own videos. And sharing her innermost thoughts with the world has given her more fuel to explore everything about herself that she had supressed for much of her life.

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Related | Bad Bunny Just Hits Different

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"I think in so many ways I shrank myself, and I tried to hide in eating disorders, in what I would wear, in what I wouldn't say, in all the things I wouldn't let myself do. And now I'm trying as hard as I can to be like, 'Fuck all of that. Fuck all of that. I will be as loud and take as much space as I can.'"

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Click Here to Order Zendaya's Extreme Issue

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Photography: Sacha Cohen

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Mon, 01 Jul 2019 16:32:25 +0000http://www.wupxae.live/emilia-fart-2639044264.htmlEmilia fartExtremeYoutubeStory Ellie MacDonald / Photography Sacha Cohen
We See You, Jaah Kellyhttp://www.wupxae.live/jaah-kelly-pride-2638994796.html

It's understandable why 18-year-old Jaah Kelly, child of disgraced R&B singer R. Kelly and choreographer/activist Drea Kelly, would avoid opening up to the media.

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But here we are, as Jaah leans against a vintage Mustang with racing stripes in Atlanta, where she lives. She folds her arms and fixes a steely almond-eyed gaze on the camera, as a crew of photographers, stylists and assistants watch nearby. In 90-degree Southern gulf swelter, Jaah's lips alternately curl ever-so-slightly from menacing sneer to a boyish, close-mouthed smile. The sun spotlights her face tattoo, a roman numeral three to represent her siblings, and one on her neck: "Fear is only as the mind allows."Jaah is sexy, fly, and unbothered — and for her first-ever professional photo shoot, a natural.

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Related | Janelle Monáe: Trans Folks to the Front

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Her expressions and poses — free, loose, limber — conceal whatever shyness she might be feeling on set. Because Jaah speaks so little, she is otherwise impossible to read, so when she does, everyone is forced to listen. "There is a difference between someone who walks into a room and demands your respect [and someone who] commands your respect," mother Drea says. "[Jaah] just commands a room. She has that energy, that confidence."

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When Jaah was 14, she came out as trans male in a video posted to her then-active Ask.fm account. The announcement was prompted by a question posed anonymously. Jaah Kelly introduced herself then as Jay Kelly.

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"I believe I am a boy and want surgery and the medication to help me be who I was supposed to be," Jaah explained. She said she knew she was trans at 6 or 7 years old, and slowly started to identify with he/him pronouns. Her family was supportive, she said, and addressed her correctly. At the time, gossip sites reported that Jaah was rejected by her family, though Jaah said on Ask.fm, "[My mom] was like, 'Baby, you know I love you if you were bi, gay, [lesbian], you name it and I would still love you so much."

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Following the announcement, which was reported on by a few media outlets, Jaah continued to answer questions from her Ask.fm followers. According to reports documenting the now-deleted video, Jaah shared that at the time she wore a binder on her chest, and wanted to begin taking hormones.

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While it's no consolation, had Jaah really been dismissed by her family, she would have been in the company of LGBTQ teens of color everywhere who find themselves facing not only rejection from their own communities but the potential of homelessness and a life of disenfranchisement set forth by a larger white society. Safe Horizon asserts that young people, including LGBTQ youth ages 12 and above, "often become homeless in order to escape violence or abuse happening in their homes such as physical and sexual abuse and neglect." According to a 2015 report by Safe Horizon, unaccompanied homeless youth seeking refuge in shelters, drop-in centers, and even in places where they trade sex for shelter (or are forced to), represent 6 percent of the total U.S. homeless population. Over 70 percent of homeless youth identify as people of color, and 44 percent of them identify as LGBTQ. In many cases, cycles like these can be hard to break free from, once set in motion.

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When I, a Black, nonbinary person, first came out at 16 as queer to my family, I, too, soon found myself feeling alone.

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On set, this is all front of mind when talking to Buku Abi, Jaah's older sister, about her younger sibling. She flips her lavender hair and speaks softly, but like Jaah, not often. Buku smiles and sways to Solange's "Way to the Show," as the shoot moves indoors and Jaah's hair is teased out from tight knots to a soft, bountiful Afro. When talking about Jaah, Buku's eyes widen and her smile beams. "He's my little one and I adore her," she says, which feels intentional, somehow.

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The next evening, Jaah is sitting alone at the bar of The Lawrence in midtown Atlanta, which is often compared to Chicago's gay-friendly Boystown neighborhood. She picked the restaurant, but she ate before she came. Jaah's vegan, mostly because her family is also vegan, and she's not old enough to legally drink, so she's slowly nursing a nonalcoholic beverage. She pulls out an iPhone with an extremely cracked screen and texts her PR rep (a family friend) to let her know I've arrived. She seems a little nervous.

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We're not here to talk about her father, I assure her. And she should only say what she wants to about that online video she posted years ago to Ask.fm, if anything at all.

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Establishing trust with a person like Jaah is important. Growing up, she moved around so often with her brother, sister, and mother, that she could barely make friends. She says she didn't feel she could open up to those outside her inner circle. Even with famous family aside, secretly knowing she was queer in a world that shames LGBTQ+ people is a recipe for chronic distrust.

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"I always felt like I had to make a choice. I knew that I was a girl who liked other girls. But because of what I was taught, I felt like the only way you could like another girl is if you were a boy."

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"When I posted that video, I was so scared," Jaah says. "When I was younger, I always felt like I had to make a choice. I knew that I was a girl who liked other girls. But because of what I was taught, I felt like the only way you could like another girl is if you were a boy."

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By 14, Jaah was already someone who rejected binary female coding, opting to wear men's clothing exclusively over dresses or high heels. This self-expression got Jaah "in trouble" in the world, she says, recalling a few occasions where she'd been stopped by strangers to tell her she was entering the "wrong" restroom. This has even happened to Jaah in ostensibly queer-friendly settings. It's something she and Buku have laughed about.

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"One time at the Pride parade in Chicago, I was with Buku and my cousin," Jaah says. "My sister had to use the bathroom afterward, but she was in there a while so I went in to check on her. I kept putting my head in the bathroom just to make sure she was good. And this lady came up and was like, 'Sir, if you peek your head in the women's bathroom again, I'm going to call security.'"

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Jaah was wearing a button-down shirt with a sports bra underneath it and the shirt was open. "So then I just turned around and flashed her." Jaah says. "She just walked away in disgust after that. It was so funny to me and Buku and often still is so funny — the mystery that people don't know what gender I am."

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Related | Naomi Campbell Interviews Trailblazing Model Aaron Philip

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At home, Jaah says she was especially empowered by her mother to express herself however she saw fit. "She knows I make music, she knows I have tattoos, that I like what I like, and that I like to do things for myself," Jaah says.

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"I remember when Jaah first came out to me when she was 10 years old. She thought, 'Oh Mama, I was scared to tell you because I didn't think you would love me," Drea recalls. "But the unconditional love of a mother is like that of God. There is nothing you could do to earn it and there is nothing you could ever do to lose it. I told her, 'I love you because you're mine, not because of your orientation. I'm always gonna be here to protect you.' Meantime, live that best life, and live it out loud and in color. Who gives a damn what anybody else thinks?"

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But following her online reveal at 14, Jaah fell into a deep depression, which led to a three-week stay in a psychiatric hospital, an experience she declines to describe. After surviving that experience, Jaah says she saw herself differently. Today, she doesn't mind if people refer to her as male, female, genderfluid, or nonbinary — a choice that's becoming increasingly common for her age group. Research has shown that younger generations are "being affected by more open and fluid attitudes," correlated to the ubiquity of self-expression through social media. Studies vary, but all essentially point to this idea. Pew Research Center reports 59% of Gen Zers believe that online profiles asking for a person's gender should include options other than "man" or "woman." Ipsos Mori suggests that over 70 percent of Gen Zers are comfortable with homosexual relationships. A 2016 trend study by J. Walter Thompson's Innovation Group posits that 56 percent of Gen Zers strongly agreed that gender did not define a person as much as it used to, while only 28 percent of millennials felt similarly — most said that they knew someone who went by gender neutral pronouns like "they," "them," or "ze."

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"I identify as a lesbian, I know I like girls, but that's as far as I'll go to label myself," Jaah says. "It's up to you how you see me. Either way, I don't care. I stand in my truth, and why does my truth need a label?"

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While in high school, Jaah played the clarinet and trumpet, and eventually taught herself to play piano from watching YouTube videos. When things felt chaotic in her head or at home during the day, she would bury herself alone in music at night, sometimes all night, producing and recording tracks at home. Jaah wants the world to soon hear all she's been working on for the past few years. She grew up surrounded by music, from her siblings to her parents, so it's only natural she'd try her hand at making her own.

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At the Lawrence, Jaah queues up a demo (working title: "Trapping For My People") she'd been working on the night before until 6 AM that day. In the atmospheric mix, Jaah's voice is both fragile, as if cautiously woven together by threads of fine silk, and surefooted. She sounds in command of what she wants to say and how she wants to say it. The voice sounds genderless, and the music genreless. There are clear roots in golden-age hip-hop and R&B, and Jaah's staccato vocal style recalls the era's top acts, from Missy Elliott to Destiny's Child. The lyrics feel foreboding and serious, but they're intentionally obscured.


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In "Reservoir," another JaahBaby original premiering today on PAPER, she emerges more clearly from the shadows a self-styled player. Jaah's aims to please her partner are direct: "You know how bad I want it/ On the bed/ Spread your legs/ Get you wet/ Kiss your neck, love," she says.

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"Jaah is fearless to me as a person, and as an artist," Drea says. "One thing she gets from her father, true in her DNA, is her ability to create and produce by ear. She's entirely self-taught. When she wanted to learn piano, she just came to me one day and told me she taught herself how on YouTube. The same goes for making beats. To have my JaahBaby [Jaah's artist name] doing what she does in a male-dominated industry makes her all the more extraordinary in my eyes."

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When it comes to producing her own music, Jaah is laser-focused, though she claims she can only make music when in a good mood. "If I am in a really good mood, I can write a song in probably an hour, make the beat in an hour, and then record it in an hour," Jaah says. "If I'm in a bad mood, it's hard to write. I'll get stuck thinking about too much and won't have any clue what to say. Sometimes I sit there until I force myself to get clear."

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More recently, she's posted snippets of her music online, and people often ask her to define her vocal style as either singing or rapping. "I'm always like, 'I mean, yeah, I sing a little,' but it's not that simple. I just use my voice," Jaah says, adding that "vocalist" is the best way to describe it. "It's like my name, Jaah, which can be male, female, whatever. That's also literally on my birth certificate. Music to me is the same way. It can be whatever you want it to be."

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"Finding a way to open up more is part of my growth. I have to get out there in the world more and not be so shy. I have nothing to lose by trying."

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When Jaah gets stuck in her head while writing music, she watches Netflix shows about extremes, like the cycles of death tackled on How to Get Away With Murder. With that show in particular, Jaah relates to star Viola Davis' morally ambiguous character, Annalise Keating. "You don't know who she likes, if it's women or men she's attracted to," Jaah says. "The show doesn't really answer questions about who she is or why, or make a big deal about it. She just is who she is. And with more people being like that in the world, maybe we're really starting to let people be who they are."

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Independence of spirit and self-liberation are key messages Jaah hopes to communicate through her music. "I'd want people to know that you can do whatever you feel you want to because you have one life," Jaah says. "The reason I dress the way I dress is because I want to. The reason I do anything at all is because I want to. It just makes me happy. I feel like there are so many people who don't do what they want to do in life. But sometimes they can't because of safety reasons or there would be negative consequences if they did. Maybe people who feel like that can listen to my music and feel like they can do whatever the hell they want. Music doesn't have one sound, one identity, and neither do people. Just let go of everything."

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Growing up, it wasn't particularly easy for Jaah to learn to let go. Her environment was full of constant external change. She moved around a lot, staying at homes in Illinois, California, and these days, the greater Atlanta area. While she admits to typical, misunderstood middle child syndrome, Jaah says that she mostly kept to herself in school. Her classmates were predominantly white students, who she didn't necessarily feel she could trust, so she relied on her family for kinship. In between transitional phases of her life, Jaah has worked a few regular jobs: one at a baseball stadium and another at a warehouse. Despite these social exchanges in the world with other people, Jaah still decided she didn't need friends to make it in life. She tells me several times that she doesn't consider herself "a person with friends." Jaah insists she had a good experience in grade school (currently, Jaah is a high school graduate and is exploring the possibility of enrolling in music recording arts programs at higher-education institutions like Full Sail University.)

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Related | Andy Cohen's Factory

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"In school I was super in the background," Jaah says. "I didn't talk to anybody or speak unless spoken to, basically. But I've always been independent, more to myself. Honestly, I kind of taught myself what I know. Obviously my mom played a huge role in that, but when I was alone and didn't know what to do or what decision to make, I realized I had only myself. It kind of helped me as I grew up. Being independent in a way forced me to really connect with who I am."

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Though I'm hearing all of this, I'm still stuck on Jaah's insistence that she doesn't have or need friends. I ask her what she defines as friendship.

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"I honestly don't know," Jaah says. "I'm a good listener and I'm there when people need advice. But then, people will try to be my friend but I don't know what to do to be a friend back. I also have a thing where people reach out to me and I don't always hit them up first. It's something I've always struggled with, because I've had horrible trust issues. Sometimes people get really mad at me. I know I can't be that way for the rest of my life."

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She holds up her phone: "I mean, look, I talk to my brother and sister, but I'm not, like, constantly texting anyone," Jaah says. "I guess I have my cousin I'd consider a close friend."

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When it comes to dating, Jaah says that she doesn't get into relationships with anyone. "I'm starting to open up," she says. "Like, I'm completely open when talking to people I'm interested in. But even if I was in a relationship, I probably wouldn't be in a relationship with just that one person. There are too many personalities and experiences you can miss just talking to one person every day of your life. It just seems like there's so much more you can explore with other people."

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I remember how I felt and where I was when I was Jaah's age. I can certainly relate to the feeling of being alone. At 18, I was already living on my own as a high school senior, having left the house during junior year. I felt my family had rejected me for coming out queer; they could never understand who I was, let alone who I was becoming. I worked several jobs to put myself through high school and slept on friends' couches, and sometimes, outside in inclement weather. My friendships were hardly what one might call stable. It was a chaotic time.

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Part of what got me through was a survival skill: self-reliance, the ability to be guarded, and even to lie when it felt necessary to protect myself. Experience eventually wore my guards down, and sooner than I expected, openness became my new mechanism for survival. I became weary of how often I shut people out, and maintaining a facade of being strong and okay when I didn't actually feel either. I realized how painful it was to go through life alone. I had to learn to trust myself and others, and in order to do so, I had to tell the truth. To someone — anyone who could listen and hear me.

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"I know finding a way to open up more is part of my growth," Jaah says. "I know that's something I have to do. I have to get out there in the world more and not be so shy. I have nothing to lose by trying."

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Part of Jaah's journey might involve a similar trajectory or not, but she's clearly, for now, putting her soul and a lifetime of emotions into her music as JaahBaby. She's ready to share it with the world, and seems intent on music being her lasting impact on others.

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When we finish dinner, Jaah rides along with me to the Atlanta airport. We talk more about the music industry, and the many ways that artists package and sell themselves today. She misses old Drake, loves the psychedelic vibes of Jhene Aiko, and feels that vocally gifted artists like Alicia Keys and Anthony Hamilton are underrated. As we part ways, I notice a vulnerability appear in Jaah's eyes that has been hidden all weekend. While some choose to see vulnerability as a sign of weakness, others argue that showing vulnerability requires hefty measures of openness, strength, and trust. Brené Brown has written and spoken extensively on the subject. "Staying vulnerable is a risk we have to take if we want to experience connection," she has written, defining courage as a process that starts with "showing up and letting ourselves be seen."

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After years of hiding in the background, Jaah is slowly letting herself be seen, both as an artist and as a human being.

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"Going after my music is the thing I'm proudest of in my life," she says. "I've always been such a background person, and never wanted to do anything in front of anyone. I'm really proud of myself for letting people listen to my music. There was a point where not even my sister, brother, or mom could hear it. I was the only one who knew what I was capable of. Now, everyone else will know, too."

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Photographer: Christian Cody
Stylist: Metta Conchetta
Groomer: Kbstyles

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Thu, 27 Jun 2019 13:58:56 +0000http://www.wupxae.live/jaah-kelly-pride-2638994796.htmlJaah kellyR. kellyLgbtqPrideStory Michael Love Michael / Photography Christian Cody
Naomi Campbell Interviews Trailblazing Model Aaron Philiphttp://www.wupxae.live/aaron-philip-naomi-campbell-pride-2638910236.html

When Aaron Philip made her runway debut this month at Willie Norris' fashion show, screams from the crowd vibrated the walls and finger snaps filled the air. She wore a bold red lip, platinum blonde bob and a t-shirt hung across the back of her wheelchair with the words "Queer Capital."

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The moment was life-changing for Philip, who wrote on Instagram after, "My hands were shaking and my heart was beating out of my chest." As a Black, transgender, wheelchair-using teenager, the 18-year-old's appearance was an opportunity she willed into existence within a few short years — and it's only the beginning. "I hope that my first show goes to show that runways and fashion collections with people like me in it can be possible," Philip wrote, "and there should be more things and opportunities like this everywhere within the fashion industry/world."

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In November 2017, Philip posted photos of herself on Twitter that expressed her dreams of becoming a professional model with cerebral palsy. "When I get scouted/discovered by a modeling agency, it's over for y'all," she warned, demanding greater representation in the fashion industry to reflect her own life experiences. To date, Philip's tweet has nearly 24k retweets and 100k likes — the first viral push that helped kickstart her freelance modeling career. With support from her family, who are originally from Antigua and immigrated to the U.S. when Philip was three, she started posing for fashion editorials and campaigns, all while building her online profile (She has more than 100k combined followers.)

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Elite Model Management eventually contracted her in September 2018, making Philip the first Black, trans disabled model to sign for a major agency. With backing from a fashion gatekeeper that's previously worked with icons like Naomi Campbell and Tyra Banks, Philip has become a model of the moment, and landed her first major campaign this summer with Sephora. Her image, photographed by Luke Gilford, is plastered across New York City; there's something truly remarkable about seeing Philip blown up to the size of a city bus, looking down on passersby — completely self-made and self-assured.

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Campbell, whom Philip says is one of her greatest modeling influences, shared a similar experience of pushing forward in the face of systematic resistance. At the beginning of Campbell's career, she was subject to blatant racism and discrimination in an industry that prioritized her white peers. Designers wouldn't cast Campbell because she was Black, while makeup artists and hair stylists weren't trained to work with her skin tone or hair. Even magazines upheld discriminatory practices in the '80s; after Yves St. Laurent threatened to cut advertising from French Vogue for their refusal to put Black models on covers, Campbell became the first POC cover star in August 1988. "I understood what it meant to be Black," Campbell wrote in The Guardian. "You had to put in the extra effort. You had to be twice as good."

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Philip sees the connections between her work today and Campbell's. "We're both Black women getting a platform and doing lots of work that should be done," she says. "And we're being visible in the ways that leave an impact and a lasting impression. We're garnering success and we will continue to, and with that comes a lot of criticism and hatred. So we have to keep our skin on, we have to keep professional even though we shouldn't have to because we deserve to express our emotions when we go through these things. It's just a matter of stepping your foot down and being brave, but also knowing that we are what we are, as we are."

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Below, for PAPER Pride, we asked Naomi Campbell and Aaron Philip to interview each other about forging a new lane in fashion, and why, despite the groundbreaking moves she's already made, Philip is just a normal teenage girl from the Bronx with huge ambitions.

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Naomi Campbell: What interested you about the fashion industry growing up, and did you have a sense that you would be part of it someday? If so, when did that moment happen?

Aaron Philip: I grew up and always looked at fashion as something that I loved, because more than anything, I was born and raised on the internet. And when you're on the internet and exposed to things like advertisements, you see fashion advertising. So I always saw Marc Jacobs, Prada and Dior, right below my keyboard, and I was like, Oh my gosh, I love this. It was only until I was about 12 or 13, when I started looking into it seriously. I got ahold of Vogue, Dazed, and i-D, and I fell in love with the industry and with seeing people wear beautiful clothes in a way that's so visible and public as models.

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I was always very aware of my identity as a person in a wheelchair. And I later became more aware of my transness eventually, but more than anything, I was hyper-aware of my disability. I realized there's no one I see on TV or online or in fashion, on the stage that I love, looking like me. And I knew that was a problem, because I knew inherently, there was nothing wrong with me. I know what people thought of disability and ableism, so I decided for it to become my journey when I was about 16, to actually become a model.

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I didn't know what that meant to me until I did research, but I knew more than anything that I wanted to start out with head shots, and I wanted to manifest these dreams. But they weren't acceptable to me if I were to go to a modeling industry and present myself because they're not exactly looking for me when they cast people or bring new faces in. So I decided to make it into a public journey where I figured, maybe if this gets enough attention and maybe if people see what I see for myself and what I see for people like me, maybe people will catch on.

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Naomi Campbell: Who was a role model to you and in what ways did they influence you?

Aaron Philip: My mom, Lydia Philip, she lives in Antigua, she's definitely one of my role models. It's because my mom is really fearless and she's very bold. She loves taking risks, she loves creating things. She loves creativity and she has this thing in her mind and heart where there's no space for bigotry, and there's no space for negativity when it comes to people who are different. She always knew that, and she raised me with a lot of thought. She put a lot of thought into making me a thinker. She really wanted me to think critically and to have my head on about the world and the way I see it and to keep my morals set. So she's this really strong individual who's really set in her ground. She's really inspiring, especially as a woman. She always says, as a woman, nothing limits her. Everything is possible no matter what it is.

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Naomi Campbell: Who are your favorite designers and who would you like to work with?

Aaron Philip: I love Miuccia Prada. I love Donatella Versace... Helmut Lang, Versace, Gucci. I'm really into the houses that are famous for making beautiful clothes and beautiful designs. The first thing that comes to mind is Prada and Miu Miu being that they're so representative of alternative femininity — either making or breaking the standard of what femininity is through their lens. They have a really contemporary image of what femininity is to them and what fashion for women and femmes are, and I feel like that's so cool to see because it's so centered around women. Also, Marc Jacobs, for sure. I love Marc Jacobs. Marc Jacobs is actually one of my number one shows.

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"In August 2018, Elite emailed me and wanted to confirm me for their modeling management and that was one of the best days of my life." — Aaron Philip

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Naomi Campbell: How has the internet helped transform your career?"

Aaron Philip: I wouldn't have a start if it wasn't for the internet. And I mean that really literally where, I went on Twitter when I was 16 and made this Tweet. I had these headshots I just took at the park, it was a November afternoon, I finally got them from my [photographer] friend, and I just said, "It's time. I'm ready." So I made my tweet and did this call to action where I said, "Honestly, when I'm scouted and discovered, it's gonna end for the industry because they've never seen anything like it before, and I think it's time to start this revolution." I don't even want to think of it as a revolution, but it kind of is within itself being that. Within the career that I have now there's been so many firsts that concern me. These things are so bare minimum to me, and should've been done light years ahead before I came along.

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Months after that Tweet came out, I did my first photo shoot with Myles Loftin, and when that came out, I was profiled by y'all at PAPER, so amazing and so special to me. Then I started getting a lot of odd jobs until I worked my way up in freelance for a year, where I started getting clients myself like ASOS and H&M, Refinery29 and Them, and NowThis News. And I started doing odd jobs, and before I knew it, my agency stepped along. In February 2018 I had met them for the first time and I remember my agent telling me, "You're the first person that I've ever seen like you." So I left, not expecting anything. Even so, they were there watching from the shadows. In August 2018, Elite emailed me and wanted to confirm me for their modeling management and that was one of the best days of my life.

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The way things were going within my freelance life, things were on and off. And I had to do a lot of work by myself. I didn't have an agent or a booker to do things for me, so I had to take care of my bookings and my demands that normally agents would put into the world. I even did taxes myself when it came to doing photoshoots in case there was a budget. I did those things myself with my dad, you know? It was rough. And then they signed me and I'm just like, "Oh wow." I never saw it coming.

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Naomi Campbell: How do you process and deal with any critics you may have?

Aaron Philip: I'm still improving on that majorly. Block and delete, at this point. My mom said I need to block and delete them because I feel like I often find myself putting so much energy into talking to these people when... it's not that I don't know that they're horrible, evil bigots, it's just that I feel like they are fully aware of what they're doing and what they're saying, and the rhetoric that they're spewing, and the hatefulness that they display. I want to say something to them because it makes me angry, like how can you just act like that? But for the sake of myself and for the sake of preserving me — these people are miserable. So more than anything, I just need to block and delete. Just go about my business.

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Naomi Campbell: How do you spiritually prepare yourself each day? Do you have a mantra or meditation you do if things ever become overwhelming?

Aaron Philip: Now that you say that, I don't take the time to do those things. My life, even before modeling, has always been so... I've always had to be so present. Because being disabled, I have to be present of people taking care of my needs. I'm just hyper-aware of everything around me. More than anything, I just jump into these things when I do them and not think twice, and I have fun, but I think it would be good to step back and prepare myself for the experiences I'm having. Even though I'm good with jumping into it because that's what I've been doing my whole life, but some of these things are so major and beyond me. And sometimes I do take the time to meditate on them and think about them, because I write about them in my journal, and I take the time to process it, but it honestly depends. It varies.

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Naomi Campbell: How does your family feel about your career?

Aaron Philip: They are so happy and so proud, which is so amazing. That's what makes it worthwhile, seeing my family being proud of me. Because I know how much sacrifices they made for me as immigrants and as hardworking mothers and fathers, to make my life what it is and come here to bring a fresh start for me. So, more than anything, making them proud is good. And I guess I make them proud by being myself, which is even the best part possible.

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"People are paying attention and seeing what can be done if things like simple accommodations are met for people with disabilities." — Aaron Philip

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Naomi Campbell: What do you hope to accomplish in your career and in your lifetime?

Aaron Philip: I feel like I've accomplished so much now and I'm so grateful for every opportunity I'm offered, being that I was once not signed. And when I started out in high fashion, not a lot was going on because I was still underage, I was still 17, which was not terrible but clients were dodgy about taking me on. I want to be able to do my job and exist as who I am, the way anyone else successful has, and make a legacy by being myself, doing my job well, and working my hardest. That's what I want for myself. But ultimately, I want to be a professional runway model. The work I'm doing currently is so essential because now I'm actually approaching brands and people of all types and saying that it's possible to put me on a runway and have it be profitable and cool.

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I guess there's this inner thought to the industry that taking on people like myself who are disabled or in wheelchairs is so taboo, and almost dangerous, because they don't know what to expect by putting someone on the runway like me. So I think that as much as I talk about it, it's starting to reach the right ears. And I think people are paying attention and seeing what can be done if things like simple accommodations are met for people with disabilities, like ramps and elevators on these venues. But also just making sure that you have these conversations in a corporate level so that within your companies, you say, "This is worth the investment-making." Because it's no different from any other models. I want to see them erase that narrative where it's like, "People with disabilities are so different to the point where they can't do anything that an able-bodied person can." That's so untrue as long as accommodations are met. It's executing a vision.

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Naomi Campbell: Do you know how many people you have helped by being your authentic and honest self?

Aaron Philip: I really don't. I think that's such an interesting question. I feel like I'm doing nothing, but trying my hardest to authentically live my life and exist as who I know I am. And there are so many false narratives and interpretations about me. When you search me up on Google, you'll see: "Aaron Philip: the trans, disabled model" over and over and over again. And you'll see old pictures of me, two years back, where I didn't look anything like I look like now as an 18-year-old model who is now signed. And people still hold on to that image of me being younger. I feel like I wasn't able to be as much as myself when I was younger as I am now. I wasn't comfortable enough, I didn't have the resources. So I want nothing more but to live my life authentically and to be seen professionally and personally as literally a Black girl in a wheelchair from the Bronx, and a teenage girl who is turning into a woman or whatever that is. I want to be seen equal. I want to have the equal opportunities that any other woman would have in life itself. I want to have those experiences. I want to have normalcy.

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Naomi Campbell: What's the best piece of advice you've ever gotten? The worst?

Aaron Philip: Be loud and don't look back, because the world has done so much to try and silence people like myself. It's just the truth of knowing that I want nothing more for myself than to be normal and to be seen as normal because I know that I am normal, no matter what my intersections are. I'm just a teenage girl. So if I have to be loud about pursuing and demanding normalcy from people just because I happen to be a little different, then that's what it's all about.

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The worst piece of advice was to just not do anything. Because I feel like people are so scared of seeing me in pain or people saying bad things about me because I am who I am, but how can you know until you try? All of that negativity and all of that hatred is invalid because I simply just am. I know what my goals are, I know what my intentions are and I want nothing more than to be loved and valued, and profitable, and successful as myself.

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"I want nothing more for myself than to be normal and to be seen as normal because I know that I am normal, no matter what my intersections are." — Aaron Philip

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Naomi Campbell: What advice would you give to young people who, like you, are trying to break the mold in some way?

Aaron Philip: Keep going. No matter what obstacles may be in your way. Just keep going and keep doing what you can to get a sense of knowledge about it. And just pursue it fully, and don't let anything stop your way, and just do what you must. Your dreams are your most important thing, and don't let go of them.

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Naomi Campbell: Where does your overall determination come from?

Aaron Philip: This is a dog-eat-dog world. You gotta do what you gotta do. If it means being determined and focused, you gotta do what you gotta do. You just have to keep pushing and leave an impact. Leave something, because we all die someday.

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Naomi Campbell: Why does representation matter?

Aaron Philip: Representation matters because everyone deserves to be objectively beautiful and be objectively desired. Everyone deserves to be acknowledged, respected, and valued, and seen as beautiful and desirable and alive for exactly who they are and what they love. Because people deserve to be themselves.

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Aaron Philip: What was modeling like for you being my age?

Naomi Campbell: Modeling for me was thrilling, I was exploring and traveling the world. I felt like a kid in a candy store. I was very comfortable traveling and exploring new countries and territories and meeting new people and photographers. It was a whole new world for me, but I had no fear about it — it was a big adventure.

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Aaron Philip: Who are people in the modeling industry that you love the most and why?

Naomi Campbell: I love the people that were there for me from the beginning, people like Beth Boldt (who discovered me), Bethann Hardison, Steven Meisel, Eileen Ford, Christy Turlington, Linda Evangelista, Stephanie Seymour, Fran?ois Nars, Oribe, Azzedine Ala?a, Marc Jacobs, and so many more. The people I grew up with and that gave me opportunity. What is wonderful is that I have gotten to maintain these friendships, with those that are still here, until this day. I call them my chosen family.

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"I listen to my body more than I listen to anything else." — Naomi Campbell

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Aaron Philip: What makes you feel empowered?

Naomi Campbell: Doing things and sharing things with people that I love, that they enjoy too. It can be something very simple, but just enjoying what I do with the people that I love is very empowering.

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Aaron Philip: As a woman in the world, how do you take care of yourself? Do you have words of advice for young women like myself?

Naomi Campbell: I take care of myself by listening to my body. I listen to my body more than I listen to anything else. If someone says for me to slow down, but my body says it's ok, I'll keep going!

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Aaron Philip: What is your ideal go to outfit?

Naomi Campbell: I don't have one [Laughs]. I have a uniform when I travel, which is leggings, a big oversized top, sneakers and always a pretty coat.

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Aaron Philip: What is your favorite thing about being Black?

Naomi Campbell: I am Black and I am proud. Whatever situations or obstacles that I have gone through in my career, I've embraced. I embrace the challenges. I am proud of the color of my skin and I wouldn't want to be any other way. The challenges have made me stronger — and made me understand that I have to share my story with the world to help the next generation after me, to make it easier for them.

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"I am Black and I am proud. Whatever situations or obstacles that I have gone through in my career, I've embraced." — Naomi Campbell

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Aaron Philip: Do you think that the fashion industry is becoming more diverse?

Naomi Campbell: It has gotten a lot better, but I still think there is a lot of improvement needed. I would now like to see the diverse models get the same contracts as their counterparts.

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Photography: Myles Loftin
Styling: Tiffani M. Williams
Hair: Evanie Frausto
Makeup: Raisa Flowers
Nails: Yuko Wada



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Mon, 24 Jun 2019 13:51:46 +0000http://www.wupxae.live/aaron-philip-naomi-campbell-pride-2638910236.htmlAaron philipElite model managementFashionModelInternetNaomi campbellTyra banksWillie norrisRunwayLgbtqPrideTransTransgenderCerebral palsyMyles loftinModelingDisabilitiesStory Justin Moran / Photography Myles Loftin
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